Bend it like Bluemix, MongoDB with auto-scaling – Part 3

In this last post of this series, I test the performance of Bluemix & MongoDB against  concurrent queries and deletes to the cloud based app with Mongo DB, with auto-scaling on. Before I started these series of tests I moved the Overload policy a couple of notches higher and made it scale out if  memory utilization > 75% for 120 secs and < 30% for 120 secs (from the earlier 55% memory utilization) as shown below.

27

The code for bluemixMongo app can be forked from Devops at bluemixMongo or can be cloned from GitHub at  bluemix-mongo-autoscale. The multi-mechanize scripts can be downloaded from GitHub at multi-mechanize     Before starting the testing I checked the current number of documents inserted by the concurrent inserts (see Bend it like Bluemix., MongoDB using Auto-scaling – Part 2). The total number as determined by checking the logs was 1380 17   Sure enough with the scaling policy change after 2 minutes the number of instanced dropped from 3 to 2

18

1. Querying the bluemixMongo app with Multi-mechanize

The Multi-mechanize Python script used for querying the bluemixMongo app simply invokes the app’s userlist URL (resp=br.open(“http://bluemixmongo.mybluemix.net/userlist/&#8221;)

v_user.py

def run(self):
# create a Browser instance
br = mechanize.Browser()
# don"t bother with robots.txt
br.set_handle_robots(False)
# start the timer
start_timer = time.time()
#print("Display userlist")
# Display 5 random documents
resp=br.open("http://bluemixmongo.mybluemix.net/userlist/")
assert("Example Mongo Page" in resp.get_data())
# stop the timer
latency = time.time() - start_timer
self.custom_timers["Userlist"] = latency
r = random.uniform(1, 2)
time.sleep(r)
self.custom_timers['Example_Timer'] = r

The configuration setup for this script creates 2 sets of 10 concurrent threads

config.cfg
run_time = 300
rampup = 0
results_ts_interval = 10
progress_bar = on
console_logging = off
xml_report = off
[user_group-1]
threads = 10
script = v_user.py
[user_group-2]
threads = 10
script = v_user.py

The corresponding userlist.js for querying the app is shown below. Here the query is constructed by creating a ‘RegularExpression’ with  a random Firstname, consisting of a random letter and a random number. Also the query is also limited to 5 documents.

function(callback)
{
// Display a random set of 5 records based on a regular expression made with random letter, number
var randnum = Math.floor((Math.random() * 10) + 1);
var alpha = ['A','B','C','D','E','F','G','H','I','J','K','L','M','N','O','P','Q','R','S','T','U','V','X','Y','Z'];
var randletter = alpha[Math.floor(Math.random() * alpha.length)];
var val =  randletter + ".*" + randnum + ".*";
// Limit the display to 5 documents
var results = collection.find({"FirstName": new RegExp(val)}).limit(5).toArray(function(err, items){
if(err) {
console.log(err + " Error getting items for display");
}
else {
res.render('userlist',
{ "userlist" : items
}); // end res.render
} //end else
db.close(); // Ensure that the open connection is closed
}); // end toArray function
callback(null, 'two');
}

2. Running the userlist query

The following screenshot shows the userlist query being executed concurrently with Multi-mechanize. Note that the number of  instances also drops down to 1

18

3. Deleting documents with Multi-mechanize

The multi-mechanize script for deleting a document is shown below. This script calls the URL with resp = br.open(“http://bluemixmongo.mybluemix.net/remuser&#8221;). No values are required to be entered into the form and the ‘submit’ is simulated.

v_user.py
def run(self):
# create a Browser instance
br = mechanize.Browser()
# don"t bother with robots.txt
br.set_handle_robots(False)
br.addheaders = [("User-agent", "Mozilla/5.0Compatible")]
# start the timer
start_timer = time.time()
# submit the request
resp = br.open("http://bluemixmongo.mybluemix.net/remuser")
#resp = br.open("http://localhost:3000/remuser")
resp.read()
# stop the timer
latency = time.time() - start_timer
# store the custom timer
self.custom_timers["Load_Front_Page"] = latency
# think-time
time.sleep(2)
# select first (zero-based) form on page
br.select_form(nr=0)
# set form field
br.form["firstname"] = ""
br.form["lastname"] = ""
br.form["mobile"] = ""
# start the timer
start_timer = time.time()
# submit the form
resp = br.submit()
resp.read()
print("Removed")
# stop the timer
latency = time.time() - start_timer
# store the custom timer
self.custom_timers["Delete"] = latency
# think-time
time.sleep(2)

config.cfg

The config file is set to start 2 sets of 10 concurrent threads and execute for 300 secs

[global]
run_time = 300
rampup = 0
results_ts_interval = 10
progress_bar = on
console_logging = off
xml_report = off
[user_group-1]
threads = 10
script = v_user.py
[user_group-2]
threads = 10
script = v_user.py
;

deleteuser.js

This Node.js script does a findOne() document and does a remove with the ‘justOne’ set to true

collection.findOne(function(err, item) {
// Delete just a single record
collection.remove(item, {justOne:true},(function (err, doc) {
if (err) {
// If it failed, return error
res.send("There was a problem removing the information to the database.");
}
else {
// If it worked redirect to userlist
res.location("userlist");
// And forward to success page
res.redirect("userlist");
}
}));
});
collection.find().toArray(function(err, items) {
console.log("Length =----------------" + items.length);
db.close();
});
callback(null, 'two');

4. Running the deleteuser multimechanize script

The output of the script executing and the reduction of the number of instances because of the change in the memory utilization policy is shown

21

5. Multi-mechanize

As mentioned in the previous posts

The multi-mechanize commands are executed as follows
To create a new project
multimech-newproject.exe userlist
This will create 2 folders a) results b) test_scripts and the file c) config.cfg. The v_user.py needs to be updated as required

To run the script
multimech-run.exe userlist

The details of the response times for the query is shown below .

All_Transactions_response_times_intervals

 

More details on latency and throughput for the queries and the deletes are included in the results folder of multi-mechanize    

6. Autoscaling The details of the auto-scaling service is shown below

a. Scaling Metric Statistics

22

b. Scaling history 23

7. Monitoring and Analytics (M & A) The output from M & A is shown  below

 

a. Performance Monitoring 24  

b. Log Analysis output The log analysis give a detailed report on the calls made to the app, the console log output and other useful information

25

The series of the 3 posts Bend it like Bluemix, MongoDB with auto-scaling demonstrated the ability of the cloud to expand and shrink based on the load on the cloud.An important requirement for Cloud Architects is design applications that can  scale horizontally without impacting the performance while keeping the costs optimum. The real challenge to auto-scaling is the need to make the application really distributed as opposed to the monolithic architectures we are generally used to.   I hope to write another post on creating simple distributed application later.

Hasta la Vista!

Also see
1.  Bend it like Bluemix, MongoDB with autoscaling – Part 1
2. Bend it like Bluemix, MongoDB with autoscaling – Part 2

You may like :
a) Latency, throughput implications for the cloud
b) The many faces of latency
c) Brewing a potion with Bluemix, PostgreSQL & Node.js in the cloud
d)  A Bluemix recipe with MongoDB and Node.js
e)Spicing up IBM Bluemix with MongoDB and NodeExpress
f) Rock N’ Roll with Bluemix, Cloudant & NodeExpress

Disclaimer: This article represents the author’s viewpoint only and doesn’t necessarily represent IBM’s positions, strategies or opinions

Bend it like Bluemix, MongoDB using Auto-scaling – Part 2!

This post takes off from my previous post Bend it like Bluemix, MongoDB using Auto-scale –  Part 1! In this post I generate traffic using Multi-Mechanize a performance test framework and check out the auto-scaling on Bluemix, besides also doing some rudimentary check on the latency and throughput for this test application. In this particular post I generate concurrent threads which insert documents into MongoDB.

Note: As mentioned in my earlier post this is more of a prototype and the typical situation when architecting cloud applications. Clearly I have not optimized my cloud app (bluemixMongo) for maximum efficiency. Also this a simple 2 tier application with a rudimentary Web interface and a NoSQL DB at This is more of a Proof of Concept (PoC) for the auto-scaling service on Bluemix.

As earlier mentioned the bluemixMongo app is a modification of my earlier post Spicing up a IBM Bluemix cloud app with MongoDB and NodeExpress. The bluemixMongo cloud app that was used for this auto-scaling test can be forked from Devops at bluemixMongo or from GitHib at bluemix-mongo-autoscale. The Multi-mechanize config file, scripts and results can be found at GitHub in multi-mechanize

The document to be inserted into MongoDB consists of 3 fields – Firstname, Lastname and Mobile. To simulate the insertion of records into MongoDB I created a Multi-Mechanize script that will generate random combination of letters and numbers for the First and Last names and a random 9 digit number for the mobile. The code for this script is shown below

1. The snippet below measure the latency for loading the ‘New User’ page

v_user.py
def run(self):
# create a Browser instance
br = mechanize.Browser()
# don"t bother with robots.txt
br.set_handle_robots(False)
print("Rendering new user")
br.addheaders = [("User-agent", "Mozilla/5.0Compatible")]
# start the timer
start_timer = time.time()
# submit the request
resp = br.open("http://bluemixmongo.mybluemix.net/newuser")
#resp = br.open("http://localhost:3000/newuser")
resp.read()
# stop the timer
latency = time.time() - start_timer
# store the custom timer
self.custom_timers["Load Add User Page"] = latency
# think-time
time.sleep(2)

The script also measures the time taken to submit the form containing the Firstname, Lastname and Mobile

# select first (zero-based) form on page
br.select_form(nr=0)
# Create random Firstname
a = (''.join(random.choice(string.ascii_uppercase) for i in range(5)))
b = (''.join(random.choice(string.digits) for i in range(5)))
firstname = a + b
# Create random Lastname
a = (''.join(random.choice(string.ascii_uppercase) for i in range(5)))
b = (''.join(random.choice(string.digits) for i in range(5)))
lastname = a + b
# Create a random mobile number
mobile = (''.join(random.choice(string.digits) for i in range(9)))
# set form field
br.form["firstname"] = firstname
br.form["lastname"] = lastname
br.form["mobile"] = mobile
# start the timer
start_timer = time.time()
# submit the form
resp = br.submit()
print("Submitted.")
resp.read()
# stop the timer
latency = time.time() - start_timer
# store the custom timer
self.custom_timers["Add User"] = latency

2. The config.cfg file is setup to generate 2 asynchronous thread pools of 10 threads for about 400 seconds

config.cfg
run_time = 400
rampup = 0
results_ts_interval = 10
progress_bar = on
console_logging = off
xml_report = off
[user_group-1]
threads = 10
script = v_user.py
[user_group-2]
threads = 10
script = v_user.py

3. The code to add a new user in the app (adduser.js) uses the ‘async’ Node module to enforce sequential processing.

adduser.js
async.series([
function(callback)
{
collection = db.collection('phonebook', function(error, response) {
if( error ) {
return; // Return immediately
}
else {
console.log("Connected to phonebook");
}
});
callback(null, 'one');
},
function(callback)
// Insert the record into the DB
collection.insert({
"FirstName" : FirstName,
"LastName" : LastName,
"Mobile" : Mobile
}, function (err, doc) {
if (err) {
// If it failed, return error
res.send("There was a problem adding the information to the database.");
}
else {
// If it worked, redirect to userlist - Display users
res.location("userlist");
// And forward to success page
res.redirect("userlist")
}
});
collection.find().toArray(function(err, items) {
console.log("**************************>>>>>>>Length =" + items.length);
db.close(); // Make sure that the open DB connection is close
});
callback(null, 'two');
}
]);

4. To checkout auto-scaling the instance memory was kept at 128 MB. Also the scale-up policy was memory based and based on the memory of the instance exceeding 55% of 128 MB for 120 secs. The scale up based on CPU utilization was to happen when the utilization exceed 80% for 300 secs.

6

5. Check the auto-scaling policy

7

6. Initially as seen there is just a single instance

9

7. At around 48% of the script with around 623 transactions the instance is increased by 1. Note that the available memory is decreased by 640 MB – 128 MB = 512 MB.

10

8. At around 1324 transactions another instance is added

Note: Bear in mind

a) The memory threshold was artificially brought down to 55% of 128 MB.b) The app itself is not optimized for maximum efficiency

12

9. The Metric Statistics tab for the Autoscaling service shows this memory breach and the trigger for autoscaling

13

10. The Scaling history Tab for the Auto-scaling service displays the scale-up and scale-down and the policy rules based on which the scaling happened

14

11. If you go to the results folder for the Multi-mechanize tool the response and throughput are captured.

The multi-mechanize commands are executed as follows
To create a new project
multimech-newproject.exe adduser
This will create 2 folders a) results b) test_scripts and the file c) config.cfg. The v_user.py needs to be updated as required

To run the script
multimech-run.exe adduser

12.The results are shown below

a) Load Add User page (Latency)

Load Add User Page_response_times_intervals

b) Load Add User (Throughput)

Load Add User Page_throughput

c)Load Add User (Latency)

Add User_response_times_intervals

d) Load Add User (Throughput)

Add User_throughput

The detailed results can be seen at GitHub at multi-mechanize

13. Check the Monitoring and Analytics Page

a) Availability

16

b) Performance monitoring

15

So once the auto-scaling happens the application can be fine-tuned and for performance. Obviously one could do it the other way around too.

As can be seen adding NoSQL Databases like MongoDB, Redis, Cloudant DB etc. Setting up the auto-scaling policy is also painless as seen above.

Of course the real challenge in cloud applications is to make them distributed and scalable while keeping the applications themselves lean and mean!

See also

Also see
1.  Bend it like Bluemix, MongoDB with autoscaling – Part 1
3. Bend it like Bluemix, MongoDB with autoscaling – Part 3

You may like :
a) Latency, throughput implications for the cloud
b) The many faces of latency
c) Brewing a potion with Bluemix, PostgreSQL & Node.js in the cloud
d)  A Bluemix recipe with MongoDB and Node.js
e)Spicing up IBM Bluemix with MongoDB and NodeExpress
f) Rock N’ Roll with Bluemix, Cloudant & NodeExpress

a) Latency, throughput implications for the cloud

b) The many faces of latency

c) Design principles of scalable, distributed systems

Disclaimer: This article represents the author’s viewpoint only and doesn’t necessarily represent IBM’s positions, strategies or opinions

Rock N’ Roll with Bluemix, Cloudant & NodeExpress

Published as a tutorial in IBM Cloudant – Bluemix tutorial and demos

In this post I create a  cloud application that is based on Bluemix, Cloudant DB and NodeExpress.  NodeExpress is used to perform DB operations on  CloudantDB

The code can be forked from Devops from bluemix-cloudant-exp. You can also clone the code from Github from bluemix-cloudant-exp

The following NodeExpress routes are created for performing the basic database operations

  1. a) Displaying the list of books
  2. b) Adding a book
  3. c) Updating a book and
  4. d) Deleting a book

1

 

Push the app to Bluemix

a) Push the app to Bluemix using
cf push bluemix-cloudant -p . -m 512M

b) In the Bluemix dashboard add the Cloudant service.

c) Double click the CloudantNoSQLDB

9

and then click the ‘Launch’ button. This will bring the WebSQL based version of Cloudant DB

10

c) Next click the link bluemix-cloudant.mybluemix.net

11

This will start the Webserver and also populate the database.

e) This can be seen in the Cloudant Dashboard for the ‘test’ database which has 3 records shown below
12
The setup for these routes in the NodeExpress are as follows

app.get('/', routes.index);
app.get('/booklist', booklist.list);
app.get('/newbook', newbook.list);
app.post('/addbook',addbook.list);
app.get('/changebook', changebook.list);
app.post('/updatebook', updatebook.list);
app.get('/rembook', rembook.list);
app.post('/deletebook',deletebook.list);

Setting up the environment for Cloudant’s PouchDB

The first thing is to setup the environment for Cloudant’s Pouch DB by parsing the process.env environment variables as shown below

//Parse the process.env for the port and host that we've been assigned
if (process.env.VCAP_SERVICES) {
// Running on Bluemix. Parse the port and host that we've been assigned.
var env = JSON.parse(process.env.VCAP_SERVICES);
var host = process.env.VCAP_APP_HOST;
var port = process.env.VCAP_APP_PORT;
console.log('VCAP_SERVICES: %s', process.env.VCAP_SERVICES);
// Also parse Cloudant settings.
var cloudant = env['cloudantNoSQLDB'][0]['credentials'];
}
var db = new pouchdb('books'),
remote =cloudant.url + '/books';
opts = {
continuous: true
};
// Replicate the DB to remote
console.log(remote);
db.replicate.to(remote, opts);
db.replicate.from(remote, opts);

Displaying the list of books

Cloudant responds to DB queries as JSON messages. Hence to display the list of books the fields of each document is stored as an array and then displayed using the Jade table in booklist.jade  This is shown below

  1. a) booklist.js

var docs = db.allDocs(function(err, response) {
val = response.total_rows;
var details = "";
j=0;
var booklist = new Array(val);
for(i=0; i < val; i++) {
db.get(response.rows[i].id, function (err,doc){
j++;
booklist[j] = new Array(3);
booklist[j][0] = doc._id;
booklist[j][1] = doc.Title;
booklist[j][2] = doc.author;
details= details + JSON.stringify(doc.Title) + "  " +  JSON.stringify(doc.author) + "\n";
// Kludge because of Node.js asynchronous handling. To be fixed - T V Ganesh
if(j == val) {
res.render('booklist', {
"booklist" : booklist
});
}
}); // End db.get
} //End for
}); // End db.allDocs

  1. b) booklist.jade

The jade template simply displays the each booklist as a row in a table

block content
h1= "Display the list of books"
p
strong DocId  Title   Author
table
each book, i in booklist
tr
td #{book}
p
p
a(href='/') Home

2

Adding a book
To add a book the book details are obtained using the newbook.jade which display a form
block content
h1= "Add a book"
form#formAddBook(name="addbook",method="post",action="/addbook")
input#inputBookTitle(type="text", placeholder="Title", name="title")
input#inputBookAuthor(type="text", placeholder="Author", name="author")
button#btnSubmit(type="submit") submit
a(href='/') Home

With the values obtained from the form above a document is inserted into the books database as follows

// Get our form values. These rely on the "name" attributes
var Title = req.body.title;
var Author = req.body.author;
db.put({
author: Author,
Title : Title,
}, Title, function (err, response) {
console.log(err || response);
if (err) {
// If it failed, return error
res.send("There was a problem adding the information to the database.");
}
else {
// Redirect to booklist - Display booklist
res.location("booklist");
// And forward to success page
res.redirect("booklist");
}
});

Note: When inserting a document into the books database the docid for the document is set to be the same as the book Title itself

7

4

Updating a book

To update a document we need to input the document id. Also the document to be updated should use the “_rev” field which is obtained when we get the document. The values to be input are taken with the changeuser form

block content

h1= "Update a book"
form#formUpdateBook(name="addbook",method="post",action="/updatebook")
input#inputDocId(type="text", placeholder="DocId", name="docid")
input#inputBookTitle(type="text", placeholder="Title", name="title")
input#inputBookAuthor(type="text", placeholder="Author", name="author")
button#btnSubmit(type="submit") submit
a(href='/') Home

The values obtained are used to populate the document as follows

db.get(DocId, function(err, response) {
db.put({
_id: DocId,
_rev: response._rev,
author: Author,
Title : Title,
}, function(err, response) {
if (err) {
// If it failed, return error
res.send("There was a problem updating the information to the database.");
}
else {
// If it worked, redirect to display books
res.location("booklist");
// And forward to success page
res.redirect("booklist");
}
});
});

6

5

Deleting a document

To delete a document we need the document id which is taken with the rembook.jade form

block content
h1= "Delete a book"
form#formDeleteBook(name="addbook",method="post",action="/deletebook")
input#DocId(type="text", placeholder="DocId", name="docid")
button#btnSubmit(type="submit") submit
a(href='/') Home

//Deleting document book1
db.get(DocId, function(err, doc) {
db.remove(doc, function(err, response) {
if (err) {
// If it failed, return error
res.send("There was a problem removing the information to the database.");
}
else {
// Redirect to booklist
res.location("booklist");
// And forward to success page
res.redirect("booklist");
}
console.log(err || response);
});
});

In the diagram below docid ‘book3’ is deleted

13

8

Important tips

  1. If you run into issues while create a Jade template then do the following

npm install jade --g

You can check your jade template for correctness using

jade <name of jade template>

If the response is ‘rendered <name of jade template>.html’ then the template is fine.

  1. If there are problems with deploying the application or if the application crashes you check the cf logs as follows for the issue

cf logs <name of application> --recent

As mentioned the  code can be forked from Devops from bluemix-cloudant-exp. You can also clone the code from Github from bluemix-cloudant-exp

Disclaimer: This article represents the author’s viewpoint only and doesn’t necessarily represent IBM’s positions, strategies or opinions

See also

1. Brewing a potion with Bluemix, PostgreSQL & Node.js in the cloud
2. A Bluemix recipe with MongoDB and Node.js
3. Spicing up IBM Bluemix with MongoDB and NodeExpress
4. A Cloud Medley with IBM’s Bluemix, Cloudant and Node.js
Find me on Google+

Spicing up a IBM Bluemix cloud app with MongoDB and NodeExpress

In this post I highlight the rudiments for a creating a cloud application on IBM’s PaaS offering Bluemix, using MongoDB and NodeExpress.   Clearly Bluemix allows one to fire up a cloud application with a NoSQL database in a matter of  a few hours which makes it really attractive. The NodeExpress  application was initially created using Enide Studio for Node.js  with a local Mongodb server running on my desktop. (Please see my post Elements of CRUD with Node Express and MongoDB) Once you have ironed out the issues in this local application you are ready to deploy on IBM Bluemix.

The code for this Bluemix application can be forked from bluemix-mongo from IBM Devops.

You can also clone the code from GitHub at bluemix-mongo

Here are the key changes that need to be made for running the NodeExpress Webserver with MongoDB as the backend DB

1) Webserver : Setup the port and host for the Webserver.

  1. app.js

var port = (process.env.VCAP_APP_PORT || 1337);
var host = (process.env.VCAP_APP_HOST || '0.0.0.0');
var app = express();
app.configure(function(){
app.set('port', port);

As seen above the host & port for the Webserver are obtained from the process.env variable.
2) Routes and Middleware
Setup the routes and invoke them appropriately in app.js
var express = require('express')
, routes = require('./routes')
, user = require('./routes/user')
, userlist = require('./routes/userlist')
, newuser = require('./routes/newuser')
, adduser = require('./routes/adduser')
, changeuser = require('./routes/changeuser')
, updateuser = require('./routes/updateuser')
, remuser = require('./routes/remuser')
, deleteuser = require('./routes/deleteuser')

app.get('/users', user.list);
app.get('/helloworld', routes.index);
app.get('/userlist', userlist.list);
app.get('/newuser', newuser.list);
app.post('/adduser',adduser.list);
app.get('/changeuser', changeuser.list);
app.post('/updateuser', updateuser.list);
app.get('/remuser', remuser.list);
app.post('/deleteuser',deleteuser.list);

3) Initialize MongoDB database: Create a set of 3 records when the Webserver starts as follows

if (process.env.VCAP_SERVICES) {
var env = JSON.parse(process.env.VCAP_SERVICES);
if (env['mongodb-2.2']) {
var mongo = env['mongodb-2.2'][0]['credentials'];
}
} else {
var mongo = {
"username" : "user1",
"password" : "secret",
"url" : "mongodb://user1:secret@localhost:27017/test"
}
}
var MongoClient = mongodb.MongoClient;
var db= MongoClient.connect(mongo.url, function(err, db) {
if(err) {
log("failed to connect to the database");
} else {
log("connected to database");
}
var collection = db.collection('phonebook');
//Clear DB and insert 3 records
remove(mycallback);
var user1 = { "FirstName" : "Tinniam", "LastName" : "Ganesh","Mobile": "916732177728" };
var user2 = { "FirstName" : "Darth", "LastName" : "Vader","Mobile": "6666699999" };
var user3 = { "FirstName" : "Bill", "LastName" : "Shakespeare","Mobile": "8342189991" };

  1. insert(user1,function(err,result){});
  2. insert(user2,function(err,result){});
  3. insert(user3,function(err,result){});
  4. find().toArray(function(err, items) {

});
});

3) Home Page: Setup up a Home page with the CRUD operations when the Bluemix cloud application’s route  for e.g. http://bluemix-mongo.mybluemix.net is clicked. This is shown below.

1

 

2

4) Display Users: To display the list of users the route /userlist is invoked. This function gets all the records from the collection and stores them into a toArray element, which is then used for rendering the list of uses with a ‘userlist.jade’ template

userlist.js
var MongoClient = mongodb.MongoClient;
var db= MongoClient.connect(mongo.url, function(err, db) {
if(err) {

  1. log(“Failed to connect to the database”);

} else {

  1. log(“Connected to database”);

}
var collection = db.collection(‘phonebook’);
//Get all records and display them

  1. find().toArray(function(err, items) {
  2.    log(items);
  3. render(‘userlist’, {

“userlist” : items
});
});
});

  1. jade

This template displays the list of users as a table. The code is shown below

extends layout
block content
h1= "Display the list of Users"
p
strong Firstname Lastname   Mobile
table
each user, i in userlist
tr
td #{user.FirstName}
td #{user.LastName}
td #{user.Mobile}
p
p
a(href='/') Home

Note: A link back to the Home page is included in here at the bottom.

7

 

5) Adding a User
There are 2 parts to this
a) Invoking the /newuser route to display the input form through the newuser.jade
b) Invoking the /adduser route to insert the values entered in the form. The changes are shown below
a) app.js
..
newuser = require('./routes/newuser')
adduser = require('./routes/adduser')
..
app.get('/newuser', newuser.list);
app.post('/adduser',adduser.list);

b) newuser.js
exports.list = function(req, res){

  1. render(‘newuser’, { title: ‘Add User’});

};

The newuser jade displays the input form
c) newuser.jade
extends layout
block content
h1= "Add a User"
form#formAddUser(name="adduser",method="post",action="/adduser")
input#inputUserFirstName(type="text", placeholder="firstname", name="firstname")
input#inputUserLastName(type="text", placeholder="lastname", name="lastname")
input#inputUserLastName(type="text", placeholder="mobile", name="mobile")
button#btnSubmit(type="submit") submit
p
p
a(href='/') Home

3

d) adduser.js

The adduser.js gets the mongo url from the process.env.VCAP_SERVICES and  setups up the connection to the DB and inserts the values received in the ‘newuser.jade’ form into the database

exports.list = function(req, res) {
if (process.env.VCAP_SERVICES) {
var env = JSON.parse(process.env.VCAP_SERVICES);
if (env['mongodb-2.2']) {
var mongo = env['mongodb-2.2'][0]['credentials'];
}
} else {
var mongo = {
"username" : "user1",
"password" : "secret",
"url" : "mongodb://user1:secret@localhost:27017/test"
}
}
// Set up the DB connection
var MongoClient = mongodb.MongoClient;
var db= MongoClient.connect(mongo.url, function(err, db) {
if(err) {

  1. log(“Failed to connect to the database”);

} else {

  1. log(“Connected to database”);

}
// Get our form values. These rely on the “name” attributes
var FirstName = req.body.firstname;
var LastName = req.body.lastname;
var Mobile = req.body.mobile;
// Set our collection
var collection = db.collection(‘phonebook’);
// Insert the record into the DB

  1. insert({

“FirstName” : FirstName,
“LastName” : LastName,
“Mobile” : Mobile
}, function (err, doc) {
if (err) {
// If it failed, return error

  1. send(“There was a problem adding the information to the database.”);

}
else {
// Redirect to userlist – Display users

  1. location(“userlist”);

// And forward to success page

  1. redirect(“userlist”);

}
});
});

If the insert is successful the userlist page is displayed with the new user

4

6) Updating a User & Deleting a User: Updating and Deleting users follow the same format as Adding a user.

7) index.jade The Home page is built using index.jade with a hyperlink invoking the route for each database operation
extends layout
block content
h1= title
p Welcome to #{title}
ul
li
a(href='/userlist') Display list of users
li
a(href='/newuser') Add a user
li
a(href='/changeuser') Update a user
li
a(href='/remuser') Delete a user

Tip: “Return of the Jadei : Getting the jade template right is truly an art as Jade is extremely finicky about spaces, tabs, indents and outdents(???). Creating the Jade template had me run into circles. I found out that you can debug the jade template individually by executing

C:> npm install jade -g"
and then  running
C:> jade <template name>

from the command prompt. If the result of the command is “rendered <template name>.html” then you are in luck and you can incorporate this jade template into your views folder for e.g.

C: >jade index.jade
rendered index.html

8) Push changes to Bluemix: Once the changes have been made push the changes on to Bluemix with ‘cf’ as follows

cf login -a https://api.ng.bluemix.net
cf push bluemix-mongo -p . -m 512M
cf create-service mongodb 100 mongodb01
cf bind-service bluemix-mongo mongodb01

 

The last 2 commands can also be performed through the Bluemix dashboard in which you add the mongodb service to your Node.js app/

8) Files and Logs: In the Bluemix dashboard you can check your logs in the Files and Logs

5

 

6

Important tip: Finally if the application fails to start when you  push the application with ‘cf’ for e.g.

cf push <app name> -p . -m 512M
....
.....
----> Writing a custom .npmrc to circumvent npm bugs
----> Installing dependencies
----> Caching node_modules directory for future builds
----> Cleaning up node-gyp and npm artifacts
----> No Procfile found; Adding npm start to new Procfile
----> Building runtime environment
----> Checking and configuring service extensions
----> Uploading droplet (7.6M)
of 1 instances running, 1 down
of 1 instances running, 1 down
of 1 instances running, 1 down
of 1 instances running, 1 down

or if  it crashes when you click a link then your debugging friend is

cf logs <app name > — recent
This will dump the error that was encountered either while the application was being started of why the application crashed.

You can fork this Bluemix application from bluemix-mongo at  IBM Devops or from GitHub at bluemix-mongo

Disclaimer: This article represents the author’s viewpoint only and doesn’t necessarily represent IBM’s positions, strategies or opinions

You may also like
1. Brewing a potion with Bluemix, PostgreSQL & Node.js in the cloud
2. A Bluemix recipe with MongoDB and Node.js
3. A Cloud Medley with IBM’s Bluemix, Cloudant and Node.js
4. Rock N’ Roll with Bluemix, Cloudant & NodeExpress


Find me on Google+

Elements of CRUD with NodeExpress and MongoDB using Enide Studio

In this post I perform basic CRUD operations using NodeExpress and MongoDB with Enide Studio. There is not a whole lot of information in the Web on using Node Express with Enide Studio so the task was kind of difficult. Anyway I managed to get basic CRUD operations to work. The complete code can be cloned from nodeexpress-mongo.

Here it is.

1) To get started create a new Node Express project with Enide Studio File->New->NodeExpress Project.

2) This should create the necessary files, routes and views.

3) Start the MongoDB as follows

mongod –dbpath <folder of project>

4) Start the mongo console. To get started I created 3 records as follows

mongo>
db.phonebook.insert({ "FirstName" : "Tinniam", "LastName" : "Ganesh","Mobile": "916732177728" })
db.phonebook.insert({ "FirstName" : "Darth", "Lastname" : "Vader","Mobile": "6666699999" })
db.phonebook.insert({ "FirstName" : "Bill", "Lastname" : "Shakespeare","Mobile": "8342189991" })

5) You can display the added records with

> db.phonebook.find().pretty()
{
"_id" : ObjectId("53de3f8e0e7f8abf82c0c850"),
"FirstName" : "Tinniam",
"LastName" : "Ganesh",
"Mobile" : "916732177728"
}
{
"_id" : ObjectId("53de3fed0e7f8abf82c0c851"),
"FirstName" : "Darth",
"Lastname" : "Vader",
"Mobile" : "6666699999"
}
{
"_id" : ObjectId("53de40200e7f8abf82c0c852"),
"FirstName" : "Bill",
"Lastname" : "Shakespeare",
"Mobile" : "8342189991"

6) For each of the CRUD operations there are 4 components

– Set the route
– Invoke app.get/app.post as approriate
– Call the necessary route Javascript file
– Use the appropriate Jade constructs for rendering the output

7) Here are the changes for the Display of the users

A) Displaying the User
a) app.js
..
userlist = require('./routes/userlist')
..
app.get('/userlist', userlist.list);
..

var mongodb = require(‘mongodb’);

b) userlist.js

/* GET Phone users page. */
exports.list =  function(req, res) {
// var db = req.db;
var MongoClient = mongodb.MongoClient;
var db= MongoClient.connect("mongodb://localhost:27017/test", function(err, db) {
if(err) {

  1. log(“Failed to connect to the database”);

} else {

  1. log(“Connected to database”);

}
var collection = db.collection(‘phonebook’);

  1. find().toArray(function(err, items) {
  2.    log(items);
  3. render(‘userlist’, {

“userlist” : items
});
});
});
};

c) userlist.jade
extends layout
block content
h1= "Display the list of Users"
p
strong Firstname Lastname   Mobile
table
each user, i in userlist
tr
td #{user.FirstName}
td #{user.LastName}
td #{user.Mobile}
p
p
a(href='http://localhost:3000') Home

This is shown below

2

 

B) Adding a User

There are 2 parts to this

a) Invoking the /newuser route to display the input form
b) Invoking the /adduser route to insert the values entered in the form. The changes are shown below

a) app.js
..
newuser = require('./routes/newuser')
adduser = require('./routes/adduser')
..
app.get('/newuser', newuser.list);
app.post('/adduser',adduser.list);

These require the following

b) newuser.js

exports.list = function(req, res){

  1. render(‘newuser’, { title: ‘Add User’});

};

The newuser jade displays the input form

c) newuser.jade

block content
h1= "Add a User"
form#formAddUser(name="adduser",method="post",action="/adduser")
input#inputUserFirstName(type="text", placeholder="firstname", name="firstname")
input#inputUserLastName(type="text", placeholder="lastname", name="lastname")
input#inputUserLastName(type="text", placeholder="mobile", name="mobile")
button#btnSubmit(type="submit") submit
p
p
a(href='http://localhost:3000') Home

3

The /adduser route inserts the record into the phonebook collection as shown

d) adduser.js

var FirstName = req.body.firstname;
var LastName = req.body.lastname;
var Mobile = req.body.mobile;
// Set our collection
var collection = db.collection('phonebook');
// Insert the record into the DB

  1. insert({

“FirstName” : FirstName,
“LastName” : LastName,
“Mobile” : Mobile
}, function (err, doc) {
if (err) {
// If it failed, return error

  1. send(“There was a problem adding the information to the database.”);

}
else {
// If it worked, redirect to userlist – Display users

  1. location(“userlist”);

// And forward to success page

  1. redirect(“userlist”);

}
});

This takes us  back to Display users if it successfully added the user

4

C) Updating a User and Deleting a User are similar to Adding a User

D) Index page

All the actions are included in the index.jade as shown below with hyperlinks

p Welcome to #{title}
ul
li
a(href='http://localhost:3000/userlist') Display list of users
li
a(href='http://localhost:3000/newuser') Add a user
li
a(href='http://localhost:3000/changeuser') Update a user
li
a(href='http://localhost:3000/remuser') Delete a user

5

Important tip:
Here is an important note. I found that getting the jade template right extremely frustrating. It is really unforgiving and is very picky up indents, outdents(whatever that is!), tabs and spaces. A quick way to check whether your jade template is fine or not is to install jade in your project directory.

npm install jade –global
You can debug your jade with
If there an error you will get

c:> jade userlist.jade
throw e
^
TypeError: userlist.jade:6
4|   h1= title
5|   ul
> 6|      each user, i in userlist
7|         li
8|           #{user.FirstName}
Cannot read property 'length' of undefined
at eval (eval at <anonymous>

If there are no errors you should see that the html is rendered as below

C: >jade index.jade
rendered index.html

You can clone the complete code from GitHub at nodeexpress-mongo

Take a look at
1. Brewing a potion with Bluemix, PostgreSQL & Node.js in the cloud
2. A Bluemix recipe with MongoDB and Node.js
3. Spicing up IBM Bluemix with MongoDB and NodeExpress
4. A Cloud Medley with IBM’s Bluemix, Cloudant and Node.js
5. Rock N’ Roll with Bluemix, Cloudant & NodeExpress


Find me on Google+