Getting started with Tensorflow, Keras in Python and R

The Pale Blue Dot

“From this distant vantage point, the Earth might not seem of any particular interest. But for us, it’s different. Consider again that dot. That’s here, that’s home, that’s us. On it everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever was, lived out their lives. The aggregate of our joy and suffering, thousands of confident religions, ideologies, and economic doctrines, every hunter and forager, every hero and coward, every creator and destroyer of civilization, every king and peasant, every young couple in love, every mother and father, hopeful child, inventor and explorer, every teacher of morals, every corrupt politician, every “superstar,” every “supreme leader,” every saint and sinner in the history of our species lived there—on the mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam.”

Carl Sagan

Tensorflow and Keras are Deep Learning frameworks that really simplify a lot of things to the user. If you are familiar with Machine Learning and Deep Learning concepts then Tensorflow and Keras are really a playground to realize your ideas.  In this post I show how you can get started with Tensorflow in both Python and R

 

Tensorflow in Python

For tensorflow in Python, I found Google’s Colab an ideal environment for running your Deep Learning code. This is an Google’s research project  where you can execute your code  on GPUs, TPUs etc

Tensorflow in R (RStudio)

To execute tensorflow in R (RStudio) you need to install tensorflow and keras as shown below
In this post I show how to get started with Tensorflow and Keras in R.

# Install Tensorflow in RStudio
#install_tensorflow()
# Install Keras
#install_packages("keras")
library(tensorflow)
libary(keras)

This post takes 3 different Machine Learning problems and uses the
Tensorflow/Keras framework to solve it

Note:
You can view the Google Colab notebook at Tensorflow in Python
The RMarkdown file has been published at RPubs and can be accessed
at Getting started with Tensorflow in R

Checkout my book ‘Deep Learning from first principles: Second Edition – In vectorized Python, R and Octave’. My book starts with the implementation of a simple 2-layer Neural Network and works its way to a generic L-Layer Deep Learning Network, with all the bells and whistles. The derivations have been discussed in detail. The code has been extensively commented and included in its entirety in the Appendix sections. My book is available on Amazon as paperback ($14.99) and in kindle version($9.99/Rs449).

1. Multivariate regression with Tensorflow – Python

This code performs multivariate regression using Tensorflow and keras on the advent of Parkinson disease through sound recordings see Parkinson Speech Dataset with Multiple Types of Sound Recordings Data Set . The clinician’s motorUPDRS score has to be predicted from the set of features

In [0]:
# Import tensorflow
import tensorflow as tf
from tensorflow import keras
In [2]:
#Get the data rom the UCI Machine Learning repository
dataset = keras.utils.get_file("parkinsons_updrs.data", "https://archive.ics.uci.edu/ml/machine-learning-databases/parkinsons/telemonitoring/parkinsons_updrs.data")
Downloading data from https://archive.ics.uci.edu/ml/machine-learning-databases/parkinsons/telemonitoring/parkinsons_updrs.data
917504/911261 [==============================] - 0s 0us/step
In [3]:
# Read the CSV file 
import pandas as pd
parkinsons = pd.read_csv(dataset, na_values = "?", comment='\t',
                      sep=",", skipinitialspace=True)
print(parkinsons.shape)
print(parkinsons.columns)
#Check if there are any NAs in the rows
parkinsons.isna().sum()
(5875, 22)
Index(['subject#', 'age', 'sex', 'test_time', 'motor_UPDRS', 'total_UPDRS',
       'Jitter(%)', 'Jitter(Abs)', 'Jitter:RAP', 'Jitter:PPQ5', 'Jitter:DDP',
       'Shimmer', 'Shimmer(dB)', 'Shimmer:APQ3', 'Shimmer:APQ5',
       'Shimmer:APQ11', 'Shimmer:DDA', 'NHR', 'HNR', 'RPDE', 'DFA', 'PPE'],
      dtype='object')
Out[3]:
subject#         0
age              0
sex              0
test_time        0
motor_UPDRS      0
total_UPDRS      0
Jitter(%)        0
Jitter(Abs)      0
Jitter:RAP       0
Jitter:PPQ5      0
Jitter:DDP       0
Shimmer          0
Shimmer(dB)      0
Shimmer:APQ3     0
Shimmer:APQ5     0
Shimmer:APQ11    0
Shimmer:DDA      0
NHR              0
HNR              0
RPDE             0
DFA              0
PPE              0
dtype: int64
Note: To see how to create dummy variables see my post Practical Machine Learning with R and Python – Part 2
In [4]:
# Drop the columns subject number as it is not relevant
parkinsons1=parkinsons.drop(['subject#'],axis=1)

# Create dummy variables for sex (M/F)
parkinsons2=pd.get_dummies(parkinsons1,columns=['sex'])
parkinsons2.head()

Out[4]
age test_time motor_UPDRS total_UPDRS Jitter(%) Jitter(Abs) Jitter:RAP Jitter:PPQ5 Jitter:DDP Shimmer Shimmer(dB) Shimmer:APQ3 Shimmer:APQ5 Shimmer:APQ11 Shimmer:DDA NHR HNR RPDE DFA PPE sex_0 sex_1
0 72 5.6431 28.199 34.398 0.00662 0.000034 0.00401 0.00317 0.01204 0.02565 0.230 0.01438 0.01309 0.01662 0.04314 0.014290 21.640 0.41888 0.54842 0.16006 1 0
1 72 12.6660 28.447 34.894 0.00300 0.000017 0.00132 0.00150 0.00395 0.02024 0.179 0.00994 0.01072 0.01689 0.02982 0.011112 27.183 0.43493 0.56477 0.10810 1 0
2 72 19.6810 28.695 35.389 0.00481 0.000025 0.00205 0.00208 0.00616 0.01675 0.181 0.00734 0.00844 0.01458 0.02202 0.020220 23.047 0.46222 0.54405 0.21014 1 0
3 72 25.6470 28.905 35.810 0.00528 0.000027 0.00191 0.00264 0.00573 0.02309 0.327 0.01106 0.01265 0.01963 0.03317 0.027837 24.445 0.48730 0.57794 0.33277 1 0
4 72 33.6420 29.187 36.375 0.00335 0.000020 0.00093 0.00130 0.00278 0.01703 0.176 0.00679 0.00929 0.01819 0.02036 0.011625 26.126 0.47188 0.56122 0.19361 1 0

# Create a training and test data set with 80%/20%
train_dataset = parkinsons2.sample(frac=0.8,random_state=0)
test_dataset = parkinsons2.drop(train_dataset.index)

# Select columns
train_dataset1= train_dataset[['age', 'test_time', 'Jitter(%)', 'Jitter(Abs)',
       'Jitter:RAP', 'Jitter:PPQ5', 'Jitter:DDP', 'Shimmer', 'Shimmer(dB)',
       'Shimmer:APQ3', 'Shimmer:APQ5', 'Shimmer:APQ11', 'Shimmer:DDA', 'NHR',
       'HNR', 'RPDE', 'DFA', 'PPE', 'sex_0', 'sex_1']]
test_dataset1= test_dataset[['age','test_time', 'Jitter(%)', 'Jitter(Abs)',
       'Jitter:RAP', 'Jitter:PPQ5', 'Jitter:DDP', 'Shimmer', 'Shimmer(dB)',
       'Shimmer:APQ3', 'Shimmer:APQ5', 'Shimmer:APQ11', 'Shimmer:DDA', 'NHR',
       'HNR', 'RPDE', 'DFA', 'PPE', 'sex_0', 'sex_1']]
In [7]:
# Generate the statistics of the columns for use in normalization of the data
train_stats = train_dataset1.describe()
train_stats = train_stats.transpose()
train_stats
Out[7]:
count mean std min 25% 50% 75% max
age 4700.0 64.792766 8.870401 36.000000 58.000000 65.000000 72.000000 85.000000
test_time 4700.0 93.399490 53.630411 -4.262500 46.852250 93.405000 139.367500 215.490000
Jitter(%) 4700.0 0.006136 0.005612 0.000830 0.003560 0.004900 0.006770 0.099990
Jitter(Abs) 4700.0 0.000044 0.000036 0.000002 0.000022 0.000034 0.000053 0.000396
Jitter:RAP 4700.0 0.002969 0.003089 0.000330 0.001570 0.002235 0.003260 0.057540
Jitter:PPQ5 4700.0 0.003271 0.003760 0.000430 0.001810 0.002480 0.003460 0.069560
Jitter:DDP 4700.0 0.008908 0.009267 0.000980 0.004710 0.006705 0.009790 0.172630
Shimmer 4700.0 0.033992 0.025922 0.003060 0.019020 0.027385 0.039810 0.268630
Shimmer(dB) 4700.0 0.310487 0.231016 0.026000 0.175000 0.251000 0.363250 2.107000
Shimmer:APQ3 4700.0 0.017125 0.013275 0.001610 0.009190 0.013615 0.020562 0.162670
Shimmer:APQ5 4700.0 0.020151 0.016848 0.001940 0.010750 0.015785 0.023733 0.167020
Shimmer:APQ11 4700.0 0.027508 0.020270 0.002490 0.015630 0.022685 0.032713 0.275460
Shimmer:DDA 4700.0 0.051375 0.039826 0.004840 0.027567 0.040845 0.061683 0.488020
NHR 4700.0 0.032116 0.060206 0.000304 0.010827 0.018403 0.031452 0.748260
HNR 4700.0 21.704631 4.288853 1.659000 19.447750 21.973000 24.445250 37.187000
RPDE 4700.0 0.542549 0.100212 0.151020 0.471235 0.543490 0.614335 0.966080
DFA 4700.0 0.653015 0.070446 0.514040 0.596470 0.643285 0.710618 0.865600
PPE 4700.0 0.219559 0.091506 0.021983 0.156470 0.205340 0.264017 0.731730
sex_0 4700.0 0.681489 0.465948 0.000000 0.000000 1.000000 1.000000 1.000000
sex_1 4700.0 0.318511 0.465948 0.000000 0.000000 0.000000 1.000000 1.000000
In [0]:
# Create the target variable
train_labels = train_dataset.pop('motor_UPDRS')
test_labels = test_dataset.pop('motor_UPDRS')
In [0]:
# Normalize the data by subtracting the mean and dividing by the standard deviation
def normalize(x):
  return (x - train_stats['mean']) / train_stats['std']

# Create normalized training and test data
normalized_train_data = normalize(train_dataset1)
normalized_test_data = normalize(test_dataset1)
In [0]:
# Create a Deep Learning model with keras
model = tf.keras.Sequential([
    keras.layers.Dense(6, activation=tf.nn.relu, input_shape=[len(train_dataset1.keys())]),
    keras.layers.Dense(9, activation=tf.nn.relu),
    keras.layers.Dense(6,activation=tf.nn.relu),
    keras.layers.Dense(1)
  ])

# Use the Adam optimizer with a learning rate of 0.01
optimizer=keras.optimizers.Adam(lr=.01, beta_1=0.9, beta_2=0.999, epsilon=None, decay=0.0, amsgrad=False)

# Set the metrics required to be Mean Absolute Error and Mean Squared Error.For regression, the loss is mean_squared_error
model.compile(loss='mean_squared_error',
                optimizer=optimizer,
                metrics=['mean_absolute_error', 'mean_squared_error'])
In [0]:
# Create a model
history=model.fit(
  normalized_train_data, train_labels,
  epochs=1000, validation_data = (normalized_test_data,test_labels), verbose=0)
In [26]:
hist = pd.DataFrame(history.history)
hist['epoch'] = history.epoch
hist.tail()
Out[26]:
loss mean_absolute_error mean_squared_error val_loss val_mean_absolute_error val_mean_squared_error epoch
995 15.773989 2.936990 15.773988 16.980803 3.028168 16.980803 995
996 15.238623 2.873420 15.238622 17.458752 3.101033 17.458752 996
997 15.437594 2.895500 15.437593 16.926016 2.971508 16.926018 997
998 15.867891 2.943521 15.867892 16.950249 2.985036 16.950249 998
999 15.846878 2.938914 15.846880 17.095623 3.014504 17.095625 999
In [30]:
def plot_history(history):
  hist = pd.DataFrame(history.history)
  hist['epoch'] = history.epoch

  plt.figure()
  plt.xlabel('Epoch')
  plt.ylabel('Mean Abs Error')
  plt.plot(hist['epoch'], hist['mean_absolute_error'],
           label='Train Error')
  plt.plot(hist['epoch'], hist['val_mean_absolute_error'],
           label = 'Val Error')
  plt.ylim([2,5])
  plt.legend()

  plt.figure()
  plt.xlabel('Epoch')
  plt.ylabel('Mean Square Error ')
  plt.plot(hist['epoch'], hist['mean_squared_error'],
           label='Train Error')
  plt.plot(hist['epoch'], hist['val_mean_squared_error'],
           label = 'Val Error')
  plt.ylim([10,40])
  plt.legend()
  plt.show()


plot_history(history)

Observation

It can be seen that the mean absolute error is on an average about +/- 4.0. The validation error also is about the same. This can be reduced by playing around with the hyperparamaters and increasing the number of iterations

1a. Multivariate Regression in Tensorflow – R

# Install Tensorflow in RStudio
#install_tensorflow()
# Install Keras
#install_packages("keras")
library(tensorflow)
library(keras)
library(dplyr)
library(dummies)
## dummies-1.5.6 provided by Decision Patterns
library(tensorflow)
library(keras)

Multivariate regression

This code performs multivariate regression using Tensorflow and keras on the advent of Parkinson disease through sound recordings see Parkinson Speech Dataset with Multiple Types of Sound Recordings Data Set. The clinician’s motorUPDRS score has to be predicted from the set of features.

Read the data

# Download the Parkinson's data from UCI Machine Learning repository
dataset <- read.csv("https://archive.ics.uci.edu/ml/machine-learning-databases/parkinsons/telemonitoring/parkinsons_updrs.data")

# Set the column names
names(dataset) <- c("subject","age", "sex", "test_time","motor_UPDRS","total_UPDRS","Jitter","Jitter.Abs",
                 "Jitter.RAP","Jitter.PPQ5","Jitter.DDP","Shimmer", "Shimmer.dB", "Shimmer.APQ3",
                 "Shimmer.APQ5","Shimmer.APQ11","Shimmer.DDA", "NHR","HNR", "RPDE", "DFA","PPE")

# Remove the column 'subject' as it is not relevant to analysis
dataset1 <- subset(dataset, select = -c(subject))

# Make the column 'sex' as a factor for using dummies
dataset1$sex=as.factor(dataset1$sex)
# Add dummy variables for categorical cariable 'sex'
dataset2 <- dummy.data.frame(dataset1, sep = ".")
## Warning in model.matrix.default(~x - 1, model.frame(~x - 1), contrasts =
## FALSE): non-list contrasts argument ignored
dataset3 <- na.omit(dataset2)

Split the data as training and test in 80/20

## Split data 80% training and 20% test
sample_size <- floor(0.8 * nrow(dataset3))

## set the seed to make your partition reproducible
set.seed(12)
train_index <- sample(seq_len(nrow(dataset3)), size = sample_size)

train_dataset <- dataset3[train_index, ]
test_dataset <- dataset3[-train_index, ]

train_data <- train_dataset %>% select(sex.0,sex.1,age, test_time,Jitter,Jitter.Abs,Jitter.PPQ5,Jitter.DDP,
                              Shimmer, Shimmer.dB,Shimmer.APQ3,Shimmer.APQ11,
                              Shimmer.DDA,NHR,HNR,RPDE,DFA,PPE)

train_labels <- select(train_dataset,motor_UPDRS)
test_data <- test_dataset %>% select(sex.0,sex.1,age, test_time,Jitter,Jitter.Abs,Jitter.PPQ5,Jitter.DDP,
                              Shimmer, Shimmer.dB,Shimmer.APQ3,Shimmer.APQ11,
                              Shimmer.DDA,NHR,HNR,RPDE,DFA,PPE)
test_labels <- select(test_dataset,motor_UPDRS)

Normalize the data

 # Normalize the data by subtracting the mean and dividing by the standard deviation
normalize<-function(x) {
  y<-(x - mean(x)) / sd(x)
  return(y)
}

normalized_train_data <-apply(train_data,2,normalize)
# Convert to matrix
train_labels <- as.matrix(train_labels)
normalized_test_data <- apply(test_data,2,normalize)
test_labels <- as.matrix(test_labels)

Create the Deep Learning Model

model <- keras_model_sequential()
model %>% 
  layer_dense(units = 6, activation = 'relu', input_shape = dim(normalized_train_data)[2]) %>% 
  layer_dense(units = 9, activation = 'relu') %>%
  layer_dense(units = 6, activation = 'relu') %>%
  layer_dense(units = 1)

# Set the metrics required to be Mean Absolute Error and Mean Squared Error.For regression, the loss is 
# mean_squared_error
model %>% compile(
  loss = 'mean_squared_error',
  optimizer = optimizer_rmsprop(),
  metrics = c('mean_absolute_error','mean_squared_error')
)

# Fit the model
# Use the test data for validation
history <- model %>% fit(
  normalized_train_data, train_labels, 
  epochs = 30, batch_size = 128, 
  validation_data = list(normalized_test_data,test_labels)
)

Plot mean squared error, mean absolute error and loss for training data and test data

plot(history)

Fig1

2. Binary classification in Tensorflow – Python

This is a simple binary classification problem from UCI Machine Learning repository and deals with data on Breast cancer from the Univ. of Wisconsin Breast Cancer Wisconsin (Diagnostic) Data Set bold text

In [31]:
import tensorflow as tf
from tensorflow import keras
import pandas as pd
# Read the data set from UCI ML site
dataset_path = keras.utils.get_file("breast-cancer-wisconsin.data", "https://archive.ics.uci.edu/ml/machine-learning-databases/breast-cancer-wisconsin/breast-cancer-wisconsin.data")
raw_dataset = pd.read_csv(dataset_path, sep=",", na_values = "?", skipinitialspace=True,)
dataset = raw_dataset.copy()

#Check for Null and drop
dataset.isna().sum()
dataset = dataset.dropna()
dataset.isna().sum()

# Set the column names
dataset.columns = ["id","thickness",	"cellsize",	"cellshape","adhesion","epicellsize",
                    "barenuclei","chromatin","normalnucleoli","mitoses","class"]
dataset.head()
Downloading data from https://archive.ics.uci.edu/ml/machine-learning-databases/breast-cancer-wisconsin/breast-cancer-wisconsin.data
24576/19889 [=====================================] - 0s 1us/step
id	thickness	cellsize	cellshape	adhesion	epicellsize	barenuclei	chromatin	normalnucleoli	mitoses	class
0	1002945	5	4	4	5	7	10.0	3	2	1	2
1	1015425	3	1	1	1	2	2.0	3	1	1	2
2	1016277	6	8	8	1	3	4.0	3	7	1	2
3	1017023	4	1	1	3	2	1.0	3	1	1	2
4	1017122	8	10	10	8	7	10.0	9	7	1	4
# Create a training/test set in the ratio 80/20
train_dataset = dataset.sample(frac=0.8,random_state=0)
test_dataset = dataset.drop(train_dataset.index)

# Set the training and test set
train_dataset1= train_dataset[['thickness','cellsize','cellshape','adhesion',
                'epicellsize', 'barenuclei', 'chromatin', 'normalnucleoli','mitoses']]
test_dataset1=test_dataset[['thickness','cellsize','cellshape','adhesion',
                'epicellsize', 'barenuclei', 'chromatin', 'normalnucleoli','mitoses']]
In [34]:
# Generate the stats for each column to be used for normalization
train_stats = train_dataset1.describe()
train_stats = train_stats.transpose()
train_stats
Out[34]:
count mean std min 25% 50% 75% max
thickness 546.0 4.430403 2.812768 1.0 2.0 4.0 6.0 10.0
cellsize 546.0 3.179487 3.083668 1.0 1.0 1.0 5.0 10.0
cellshape 546.0 3.225275 3.005588 1.0 1.0 1.0 5.0 10.0
adhesion 546.0 2.921245 2.937144 1.0 1.0 1.0 4.0 10.0
epicellsize 546.0 3.261905 2.252643 1.0 2.0 2.0 4.0 10.0
barenuclei 546.0 3.560440 3.651946 1.0 1.0 1.0 7.0 10.0
chromatin 546.0 3.483516 2.492687 1.0 2.0 3.0 5.0 10.0
normalnucleoli 546.0 2.875458 3.064305 1.0 1.0 1.0 4.0 10.0
mitoses 546.0 1.609890 1.736762 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 10.0
In [0]:
# Create target variables
train_labels = train_dataset.pop('class')
test_labels = test_dataset.pop('class')
In [0]:
# Set the target variables as 0 or 1
train_labels[train_labels==2] =0 # benign
train_labels[train_labels==4] =1 # malignant

test_labels[test_labels==2] =0 # benign
test_labels[test_labels==4] =1 # malignant
In [0]:
# Normalize by subtracting mean and dividing by standard deviation
def normalize(x):
  return (x - train_stats['mean']) / train_stats['std']

# Convert columns to numeric
train_dataset1 = train_dataset1.apply(pd.to_numeric)
test_dataset1 = test_dataset1.apply(pd.to_numeric)

# Normalize
normalized_train_data = normalize(train_dataset1)
normalized_test_data = normalize(test_dataset1)
In [0]:
# Create a model
model = tf.keras.Sequential([
    keras.layers.Dense(6, activation=tf.nn.relu, input_shape=[len(train_dataset1.keys())]),
    keras.layers.Dense(9, activation=tf.nn.relu),
    keras.layers.Dense(6,activation=tf.nn.relu),
    keras.layers.Dense(1)
  ])

# Use the RMSProp optimizer
optimizer = tf.keras.optimizers.RMSprop(0.01)

# Since this is binary classification use binary_crossentropy
model.compile(loss='binary_crossentropy',
                optimizer=optimizer,
                metrics=['acc'])


# Fit a model
history=model.fit(
  normalized_train_data, train_labels,
  epochs=1000, validation_data=(normalized_test_data,test_labels), verbose=0)
In [55]:
hist = pd.DataFrame(history.history)
hist['epoch'] = history.epoch
hist.tail()
loss acc val_loss val_acc epoch
995 0.112499 0.992674 0.454739 0.970588 995
996 0.112499 0.992674 0.454739 0.970588 996
997 0.112499 0.992674 0.454739 0.970588 997
998 0.112499 0.992674 0.454739 0.970588 998
999 0.112499 0.992674 0.454739 0.970588 999
In [58]:
# Plot training and test accuracy 
plt.plot(history.history['acc'])
plt.plot(history.history['val_acc'])
plt.title('model accuracy')
plt.ylabel('accuracy')
plt.xlabel('epoch')
plt.legend(['train', 'test'], loc='upper left')
plt.ylim([0.9,1])
plt.show()












# Plot training and test loss
plt.plot(history.history['loss'])
plt.plot(history.history['val_loss'])
plt.title('model loss')
plt.ylabel('loss')
plt.xlabel('epoch')
plt.legend(['train', 'test'], loc='upper left')
plt.ylim([0,0.5])
plt.show()


2a. Binary classification in Tensorflow -R

This is a simple binary classification problem from UCI Machine Learning repository and deals with data on Breast cancer from the Univ. of Wisconsin Breast Cancer Wisconsin (Diagnostic) Data Set

# Read the data for Breast cancer (Wisconsin)
dataset <- read.csv("https://archive.ics.uci.edu/ml/machine-learning-databases/breast-cancer-wisconsin/breast-cancer-wisconsin.data")

# Rename the columns
names(dataset) <- c("id","thickness",   "cellsize", "cellshape","adhesion","epicellsize",
                    "barenuclei","chromatin","normalnucleoli","mitoses","class")

# Remove the columns id and class
dataset1 <- subset(dataset, select = -c(id, class))
dataset2 <- na.omit(dataset1)

# Convert the column to numeric
dataset2$barenuclei <- as.numeric(dataset2$barenuclei)

Normalize the data

train_data <-apply(dataset2,2,normalize)
train_labels <- as.matrix(select(dataset,class))

# Set the target variables as 0 or 1 as it binary classification
train_labels[train_labels==2,]=0
train_labels[train_labels==4,]=1

Create the Deep Learning model

model <- keras_model_sequential()
model %>% 
  layer_dense(units = 6, activation = 'relu', input_shape = dim(train_data)[2]) %>% 
  layer_dense(units = 9, activation = 'relu') %>%
  layer_dense(units = 6, activation = 'relu') %>%
  layer_dense(units = 1)

# Since this is a binary classification we use binary cross entropy
model %>% compile(
  loss = 'binary_crossentropy',
  optimizer = optimizer_rmsprop(),
  metrics = c('accuracy')  # Metrics is accuracy
)

Fit the model. Use 20% of data for validation

history <- model %>% fit(
  train_data, train_labels, 
  epochs = 30, batch_size = 128, 
  validation_split = 0.2
)

Plot the accuracy and loss for training and validation data

plot(history)

3. MNIST in Tensorflow – Python

This takes the famous MNIST handwritten digits . It ca be seen that Tensorflow and Keras make short work of this famous problem of the late 1980s

# Download MNIST data
mnist=tf.keras.datasets.mnist
# Set training and test data and labels
(training_images,training_labels),(test_images,test_labels)=mnist.load_data()

print(training_images.shape)
print(test_images.shape)
(60000, 28, 28)
(10000, 28, 28)
In [61]:
# Plot a sample image from MNIST and show contents
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
plt.imshow(training_images[1])
print(training_images[1])
[[ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0]
[ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0]
[ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0]
[ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0]
[ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 51 159 253
159 50 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0]
[ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 48 238 252 252
252 237 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0]
[ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 54 227 253 252 239
233 252 57 6 0 0 0 0 0 0]
[ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 10 60 224 252 253 252 202
84 252 253 122 0 0 0 0 0 0]
[ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 163 252 252 252 253 252 252
96 189 253 167 0 0 0 0 0 0]
[ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 51 238 253 253 190 114 253 228
47 79 255 168 0 0 0 0 0 0]
[ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 48 238 252 252 179 12 75 121 21
0 0 253 243 50 0 0 0 0 0]
[ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 38 165 253 233 208 84 0 0 0 0
0 0 253 252 165 0 0 0 0 0]
[ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 178 252 240 71 19 28 0 0 0 0
0 0 253 252 195 0 0 0 0 0]
[ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 57 252 252 63 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 253 252 195 0 0 0 0 0]
[ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 198 253 190 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 255 253 196 0 0 0 0 0]
[ 0 0 0 0 0 0 76 246 252 112 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 253 252 148 0 0 0 0 0]
[ 0 0 0 0 0 0 85 252 230 25 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
7 135 253 186 12 0 0 0 0 0]
[ 0 0 0 0 0 0 85 252 223 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7
131 252 225 71 0 0 0 0 0 0]
[ 0 0 0 0 0 0 85 252 145 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 48 165
252 173 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0]
[ 0 0 0 0 0 0 86 253 225 0 0 0 0 0 0 114 238 253
162 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0]
[ 0 0 0 0 0 0 85 252 249 146 48 29 85 178 225 253 223 167
56 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0]
[ 0 0 0 0 0 0 85 252 252 252 229 215 252 252 252 196 130 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0]
[ 0 0 0 0 0 0 28 199 252 252 253 252 252 233 145 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0]
[ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 25 128 252 253 252 141 37 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0]
[ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0]
[ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0]
[ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0]
[ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0]]


# Normalize the images by dividing by 255.0
training_images = training_images/255.0
test_images = test_images/255.0

# Create a Sequential Keras model
model = tf.keras.models.Sequential([tf.keras.layers.Flatten(),
                                   tf.keras.layers.Dense(1024,activation=tf.nn.relu),
                                   tf.keras.layers.Dense(10,activation=tf.nn.softmax)])
model.compile(optimizer='adam',loss='sparse_categorical_crossentropy',metrics=['accuracy'])
In [68]:
history=model.fit(training_images,training_labels,validation_data=(test_images, test_labels), epochs=5, verbose=1)
Train on 60000 samples, validate on 10000 samples
Epoch 1/5
60000/60000 [==============================] - 17s 291us/sample - loss: 0.0020 - acc: 0.9999 - val_loss: 0.0719 - val_acc: 0.9810
Epoch 2/5
60000/60000 [==============================] - 17s 284us/sample - loss: 0.0021 - acc: 0.9998 - val_loss: 0.0705 - val_acc: 0.9821
Epoch 3/5
60000/60000 [==============================] - 17s 286us/sample - loss: 0.0017 - acc: 0.9999 - val_loss: 0.0729 - val_acc: 0.9805
Epoch 4/5
60000/60000 [==============================] - 17s 284us/sample - loss: 0.0014 - acc: 0.9999 - val_loss: 0.0762 - val_acc: 0.9804
Epoch 5/5
60000/60000 [==============================] - 17s 280us/sample - loss: 0.0015 - acc: 0.9999 - val_loss: 0.0735 - val_acc: 0.9812

Fig 1

Fig 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MNIST in Tensorflow – R

The following code uses Tensorflow to learn MNIST’s handwritten digits ### Load MNIST data

mnist <- dataset_mnist()
x_train <- mnist$train$x
y_train <- mnist$train$y
x_test <- mnist$test$x
y_test <- mnist$test$y

Reshape and rescale

# Reshape the array
x_train <- array_reshape(x_train, c(nrow(x_train), 784))
x_test <- array_reshape(x_test, c(nrow(x_test), 784))
# Rescale
x_train <- x_train / 255
x_test <- x_test / 255

Convert out put to One Hot encoded format

y_train <- to_categorical(y_train, 10)
y_test <- to_categorical(y_test, 10)

Fit the model

Use the softmax activation for recognizing 10 digits and categorical cross entropy for loss

model <- keras_model_sequential() 
model %>% 
  layer_dense(units = 256, activation = 'relu', input_shape = c(784)) %>% 
  layer_dense(units = 128, activation = 'relu') %>%
  layer_dense(units = 10, activation = 'softmax') # Use softmax

model %>% compile(
  loss = 'categorical_crossentropy',
  optimizer = optimizer_rmsprop(),
  metrics = c('accuracy')
)

Fit the model

Note: A smaller number of epochs has been used. For better performance increase number of epochs

history <- model %>% fit(
  x_train, y_train, 
  epochs = 5, batch_size = 128, 
  validation_data = list(x_test,y_test)
)

Take 4+: Presentations on ‘Elements of Neural Networks and Deep Learning’ – Parts 1-8

“Lights, camera and … action – Take 4+!”

This post includes  a rework of all presentation of ‘Elements of Neural Networks and Deep  Learning Parts 1-8 ‘ since my earlier presentations had some missing parts, omissions and some occasional errors. So I have re-recorded all the presentations.
This series of presentation will do a deep-dive  into Deep Learning networks starting from the fundamentals. The equations required for performing learning in a L-layer Deep Learning network  are derived in detail, starting from the basics. Further, the presentations also discuss multi-class classification, regularization techniques, and gradient descent optimization methods in deep networks methods. Finally the presentations also touch on how  Deep Learning Networks can be tuned.

The corresponding implementations are available in vectorized R, Python and Octave are available in my book ‘Deep Learning from first principles:Second edition- In vectorized Python, R and Octave

1. Elements of Neural Networks and Deep Learning – Part 1
This presentation introduces Neural Networks and Deep Learning. A look at history of Neural Networks, Perceptrons and why Deep Learning networks are required and concluding with a simple toy examples of a Neural Network and how they compute. This part also includes a small digression on the basics of Machine Learning and how the algorithm learns from a data set

2. Elements of Neural Networks and Deep Learning – Part 2
This presentation takes logistic regression as an example and creates an equivalent 2 layer Neural network. The presentation also takes a look at forward & backward propagation and how the cost is minimized using gradient descent


The implementation of the discussed 2 layer Neural Network in vectorized R, Python and Octave are available in my post ‘Deep Learning from first principles in Python, R and Octave – Part 1‘

3. Elements of Neural Networks and Deep Learning – Part 3
This 3rd part, discusses a primitive neural network with an input layer, output layer and a hidden layer. The neural network uses tanh activation in the hidden layer and a sigmoid activation in the output layer. The equations for forward and backward propagation are derived.


To see the implementations for the above discussed video see my post ‘Deep Learning from first principles in Python, R and Octave – Part 2

4. Elements of Neural Network and Deep Learning – Part 4
This presentation is a continuation of my 3rd presentation in which I derived the equations for a simple 3 layer Neural Network with 1 hidden layer. In this video presentation, I discuss step-by-step the derivations for a L-Layer, multi-unit Deep Learning Network, with any activation function g(z)


The implementations of L-Layer, multi-unit Deep Learning Network in vectorized R, Python and Octave are available in my post Deep Learning from first principles in Python, R and Octave – Part 3

5. Elements of Neural Network and Deep Learning – Part 5
This presentation discusses multi-class classification using the Softmax function. The detailed derivation for the Jacobian of the Softmax is discussed, and subsequently the derivative of cross-entropy loss is also discussed in detail. Finally the final set of equations for a Neural Network with multi-class classification is derived.


The corresponding implementations in vectorized R, Python and Octave are available in the following posts
a. Deep Learning from first principles in Python, R and Octave – Part 4
b. Deep Learning from first principles in Python, R and Octave – Part 5

6. Elements of Neural Networks and Deep Learning – Part 6
This part discusses initialization methods specifically like He and Xavier. The presentation also focuses on how to prevent over-fitting using regularization. Lastly the dropout method of regularization is also discussed


The corresponding implementations in vectorized R, Python and Octave of the above discussed methods are available in my post Deep Learning from first principles in Python, R and Octave – Part 6

7. Elements of Neural Networks and Deep Learning – Part 7
This presentation introduces exponentially weighted moving average and shows how this is used in different approaches to gradient descent optimization. The key techniques discussed are learning rate decay, momentum method, rmsprop and adam.

The equivalent implementations of the gradient descent optimization techniques in R, Python and Octave can be seen in my post Deep Learning from first principles in Python, R and Octave – Part 7

8. Elements of Neural Networks and Deep Learning – Part 8
This last part touches on the method to adopt while tuning hyper-parameters in Deep Learning networks

Checkout my book ‘Deep Learning from first principles: Second Edition – In vectorized Python, R and Octave’. My book starts with the implementation of a simple 2-layer Neural Network and works its way to a generic L-Layer Deep Learning Network, with all the bells and whistles. The derivations have been discussed in detail. The code has been extensively commented and included in its entirety in the Appendix sections. My book is available on Amazon as paperback ($18.99) and in kindle version($9.99/Rs449).

This concludes this series of presentations on “Elements of Neural Networks and Deep Learning’

Also
1. My book ‘Practical Machine Learning in R and Python: Third edition’ on Amazon
2. Introducing cricpy:A python package to analyze performances of cricketers
3. Natural language processing: What would Shakespeare say?
4. Big Data-2: Move into the big league:Graduate from R to SparkR
5. Presentation on Wireless Technologies – Part 1
6. Introducing cricketr! : An R package to analyze performances of cricketers

To see all posts click Index of posts

My presentations on ‘Elements of Neural Networks & Deep Learning’ -Parts 6,7,8

This is the final set of presentations in my series ‘Elements of Neural Networks and Deep Learning’. This set follows the earlier 2 sets of presentations namely
1. My presentations on ‘Elements of Neural Networks & Deep Learning’ -Part1,2,3
2. My presentations on ‘Elements of Neural Networks & Deep Learning’ -Parts 4,5

In this final set of presentations I discuss initialization methods, regularization techniques including dropout. Next I also discuss gradient descent optimization methods like momentum, rmsprop, adam etc. Lastly, I briefly also touch on hyper-parameter tuning approaches. The corresponding implementations are available in vectorized R, Python and Octave are available in my book ‘Deep Learning from first principles:Second edition- In vectorized Python, R and Octave

1. Elements of Neural Networks and Deep Learning – Part 6
This part discusses initialization methods specifically like He and Xavier. The presentation also focuses on how to prevent over-fitting using regularization. Lastly the dropout method of regularization is also discusses


The corresponding implementations in vectorized R, Python and Octave of the above discussed methods are available in my post Deep Learning from first principles in Python, R and Octave – Part 6

2. Elements of Neural Networks and Deep Learning – Part 7
This presentation introduces exponentially weighted moving average and shows how this is used in different approaches to gradient descent optimization. The key techniques discussed are learning rate decay, momentum method, rmsprop and adam.


The equivalent implementations of the gradient descent optimization techniques in R, Python and Octave can be seen in my post Deep Learning from first principles in Python, R and Octave – Part 7

3. Elements of Neural Networks and Deep Learning – Part 8
This last part touches upon hyper-parameter tuning in Deep Learning networks


This concludes this series of presentations on “Elements of Neural Networks and Deep Learning’

Important note: Do check out my later version of these videos at Take 4+: Presentations on ‘Elements of Neural Networks and Deep Learning’ – Parts 1-8 . These have more content and also include some corrections. Check it out!

Checkout my book ‘Deep Learning from first principles: Second Edition – In vectorized Python, R and Octave’. My book starts with the implementation of a simple 2-layer Neural Network and works its way to a generic L-Layer Deep Learning Network, with all the bells and whistles. The derivations have been discussed in detail. The code has been extensively commented and included in its entirety in the Appendix sections. My book is available on Amazon as paperback ($18.99) and and in kindle version($9.99/Rs449).

See also
1. My book ‘Practical Machine Learning in R and Python: Third edition’ on Amazon
2. Big Data-1: Move into the big league:Graduate from Python to Pyspark
3. My travels through the realms of Data Science, Machine Learning, Deep Learning and (AI)
4. Revisiting crimes against women in India
5. Introducing cricket package yorkr: Part 1- Beaten by sheer pace!
6. Deblurring with OpenCV: Weiner filter reloaded
7. Taking a closer look at Quantum gates and their operations

To see all posts click Index of posts

My presentations on ‘Elements of Neural Networks & Deep Learning’ -Parts 4,5

This is the next set of presentations on “Elements of Neural Networks and Deep Learning”.  In the 4th presentation I discuss and derive the generalized equations for a multi-unit, multi-layer Deep Learning network.  The 5th presentation derives the equations for a Deep Learning network when performing multi-class classification along with the derivations for cross-entropy loss. The corresponding implementations are available in vectorized R, Python and Octave are available in my book ‘Deep Learning from first principles:Second edition- In vectorized Python, R and Octave

Important note: Do check out my later version of these videos at Take 4+: Presentations on ‘Elements of Neural Networks and Deep Learning’ – Parts 1-8 . These have more content and also include some corrections. Check it out!

1. Elements of Neural Network and Deep Learning – Part 4
This presentation is a continuation of my 3rd presentation in which I derived the equations for a simple 3 layer Neural Network with 1 hidden layer. In this video presentation, I discuss step-by-step the derivations for a L-Layer, multi-unit Deep Learning Network, with any activation function g(z)


The implementations of L-Layer, multi-unit Deep Learning Network in vectorized R, Python and Octave are available in my post Deep Learning from first principles in Python, R and Octave – Part 3

2. Elements of Neural Network and Deep Learning – Part 5
This presentation discusses multi-class classification using the Softmax function. The detailed derivation for the Jacobian of the Softmax is discussed, and subsequently the derivative of cross-entropy loss is also discussed in detail. Finally the final set of equations for a Neural Network with multi-class classification is derived.


The corresponding implementations in vectorized R, Python and Octave are available in the following posts
a. Deep Learning from first principles in Python, R and Octave – Part 4
b. Deep Learning from first principles in Python, R and Octave – Part 5

To be continued. Watch this space!

Checkout my book ‘Deep Learning from first principles: Second Edition – In vectorized Python, R and Octave’. My book starts with the implementation of a simple 2-layer Neural Network and works its way to a generic L-Layer Deep Learning Network, with all the bells and whistles. The derivations have been discussed in detail. The code has been extensively commented and included in its entirety in the Appendix sections. My book is available on Amazon as paperback ($18.99) and in kindle version($9.99/Rs449).

Also see
1. My book ‘Practical Machine Learning in R and Python: Third edition’ on Amazon
2. Big Data-2: Move into the big league:Graduate from R to SparkR
3. Introducing QCSimulator: A 5-qubit quantum computing simulator in R
4. My TEDx talk on the “Internet of Things
5. Rock N’ Roll with Bluemix, Cloudant & NodeExpress
6. GooglyPlus: yorkr analyzes IPL players, teams, matches with plots and tables
7. Literacy in India – A deepR dive
8. Fun simulation of a Chain in Android

To see all posts click Index of Posts

My presentations on ‘Elements of Neural Networks & Deep Learning’ -Part1,2,3

I will be uploading a series of presentations on ‘Elements of Neural Networks and Deep Learning’. In these video presentations I discuss the derivations of L -Layer Deep Learning Networks, starting from the basics. The corresponding implementations are available in vectorized R, Python and Octave are available in my book ‘Deep Learning from first principles:Second edition- In vectorized Python, R and Octave

1. Elements of Neural Networks and Deep Learning – Part 1
This presentation introduces Neural Networks and Deep Learning. A look at history of Neural Networks, Perceptrons and why Deep Learning networks are required and concluding with a simple toy examples of a Neural Network and how they compute

2. Elements of Neural Networks and Deep Learning – Part 2
This presentation takes logistic regression as an example and creates an equivalent 2 layer Neural network. The presentation also takes a look at forward & backward propagation and how the cost is minimized using gradient descent


The implementation of the discussed 2 layer Neural Network in vectorized R, Python and Octave are available in my post ‘Deep Learning from first principles in Python, R and Octave – Part 1

3. Elements of Neural Networks and Deep Learning – Part 3
This 3rd part, discusses a primitive neural network with an input layer, output layer and a hidden layer. The neural network uses tanh activation in the hidden layer and a sigmoid activation in the output layer. The equations for forward and backward propagation are derived.


To see the implementations for the above discussed video see my post ‘Deep Learning from first principles in Python, R and Octave – Part 2

Important note: Do check out my later version of these videos at Take 4+: Presentations on ‘Elements of Neural Networks and Deep Learning’ – Parts 1-8 . These have more content and also include some corrections. Check it out!

To be continued. Watch this space!

Checkout my book ‘Deep Learning from first principles: Second Edition – In vectorized Python, R and Octave’. My book starts with the implementation of a simple 2-layer Neural Network and works its way to a generic L-Layer Deep Learning Network, with all the bells and whistles. The derivations have been discussed in detail. The code has been extensively commented and included in its entirety in the Appendix sections. My book is available on Amazon as paperback ($18.99) and in kindle version($9.99/Rs449).

You may also like
1. My book ‘Practical Machine Learning in R and Python: Third edition’ on Amazon
2. Introducing cricpy:A python package to analyze performances of cricketers
3. Natural language processing: What would Shakespeare say?
4. TWS-4: Gossip protocol: Epidemics and rumors to the rescue
5. Getting started with memcached-libmemcached
6. Simplifying ML: Impact of degree of polynomial degree on bias & variance and other insights

To see all posts click Index of posts

My book ‘Deep Learning from first principles:Second Edition’ now on Amazon

The second edition of my book ‘Deep Learning from first principles:Second Edition- In vectorized Python, R and Octave’, is now available on Amazon, in both paperback ($18.99)  and kindle ($9.99/Rs449/-)  versions. Since this book is almost 70% code, all functions, and code snippets have been formatted to use the fixed-width font ‘Lucida Console’. In addition line numbers have been added to all code snippets. This makes the code more organized and much more readable. I have also fixed typos in the book

Untitled

 

The book includes the following chapters

Table of Contents
Preface 4
Introduction 6
1. Logistic Regression as a Neural Network 8
2. Implementing a simple Neural Network 23
3. Building a L- Layer Deep Learning Network 48
4. Deep Learning network with the Softmax 85
5. MNIST classification with Softmax 103
6. Initialization, regularization in Deep Learning 121
7. Gradient Descent Optimization techniques 167
8. Gradient Check in Deep Learning 197
1. Appendix A 214
2. Appendix 1 – Logistic Regression as a Neural Network 220
3. Appendix 2 - Implementing a simple Neural Network 227
4. Appendix 3 - Building a L- Layer Deep Learning Network 240
5. Appendix 4 - Deep Learning network with the Softmax 259
6. Appendix 5 - MNIST classification with Softmax 269
7. Appendix 6 - Initialization, regularization in Deep Learning 302
8. Appendix 7 - Gradient Descent Optimization techniques 344
9. Appendix 8 – Gradient Check 405
References 475

Also see
1. My book ‘Practical Machine Learning in R and Python: Second edition’ on Amazon
2. The 3rd paperback & kindle editions of my books on Cricket, now on Amazon
3. De-blurring revisited with Wiener filter using OpenCV
4. TWS-4: Gossip protocol: Epidemics and rumors to the rescue
5. A Cloud medley with IBM Bluemix, Cloudant DB and Node.js
6. Practical Machine Learning with R and Python – Part 6
7. GooglyPlus: yorkr analyzes IPL players, teams, matches with plots and tables
8. Fun simulation of a Chain in Android

To see posts click Index of Posts

Deep Learning from first principles in Python, R and Octave – Part 3

“Once upon a time, I, Chuang Tzu, dreamt I was a butterfly, fluttering hither and thither, to all intents and purposes a butterfly. I was conscious only of following my fancies as a butterfly, and was unconscious of my individuality as a man. Suddenly, I awoke, and there I lay, myself again. Now I do not know whether I was then a man dreaming I was a butterfly, or whether I am now a butterfly dreaming that I am a man.”
from The Brain: The Story of you – David Eagleman

“Thought is a great big vector of neural activity”
Prof Geoffrey Hinton

Introduction

This is the third part in my series on Deep Learning from first principles in Python, R and Octave. In the first part Deep Learning from first principles in Python, R and Octave-Part 1, I implemented logistic regression as a 2 layer neural network. The 2nd part Deep Learning from first principles in Python, R and Octave-Part 2, dealt with the implementation of 3 layer Neural Networks with 1 hidden layer to perform classification tasks, where the 2 classes cannot be separated by a linear boundary. In this third part, I implement a multi-layer, Deep Learning (DL) network of arbitrary depth (any number of hidden layers) and arbitrary height (any number of activation units in each hidden layer). The implementations of these Deep Learning networks, in all the 3 parts, are based on vectorized versions in Python, R and Octave. The implementation in the 3rd part is for a L-layer Deep Netwwork, but without any regularization, early stopping, momentum or learning rate adaptation techniques. However even the barebones multi-layer DL, is a handful and has enough hyperparameters to fine-tune and adjust.

Checkout my book ‘Deep Learning from first principles: Second Edition – In vectorized Python, R and Octave’. My book starts with the implementation of a simple 2-layer Neural Network and works its way to a generic L-Layer Deep Learning Network, with all the bells and whistles. The derivations have been discussed in detail. The code has been extensively commented and included in its entirety in the Appendix sections. My book is available on Amazon as paperback ($18.99) and in kindle version($9.99/Rs449).

The implementation of the vectorized L-layer Deep Learning network in Python, R and Octave were both exhausting, and exacting!! Keeping track of the indices, layer number and matrix dimensions required quite bit of focus. While the implementation was demanding, it was also very exciting to get the code to work. The trick was to be able to shift gears between the slight quirkiness between the languages. Here are some of challenges I faced.

1. Python and Octave allow multiple return values to be unpacked in a single statement. With R, unpacking multiple return values from a list, requires the list returned, to be unpacked separately. I did see that there is a package gsubfn, which does this.  I hope this feature becomes a base R feature.
2. Python and R allow dissimilar elements to be saved and returned from functions using dictionaries or lists respectively. However there is no real equivalent in Octave. The closest I got to this functionality in Octave, was the ‘cell array’. But the cell array can be accessed only by the index, and not with the key as in a Python dictionary or R list. This makes things just a bit more difficult in Octave.
3. Python and Octave include implicit broadcasting. In R, broadcasting is not implicit, but R has a nifty function, the sweep(), with which we can broadcast either by columns or by rows
4. The closest equivalent of Python’s dictionary, or R’s list, in Octave is the cell array. However I had to manage separate cell arrays for weights and biases and during gradient descent and separate gradients dW and dB
5. In Python the rank-1 numpy arrays can be annoying at times. This issue is not present in R and Octave.

Though the number of lines of code for Deep Learning functions in Python, R and Octave are about ~350 apiece, they have been some of the most difficult code I have implemented. The current vectorized implementation supports the relu, sigmoid and tanh activation functions as of now. I will be adding other activation functions like the ‘leaky relu’, ‘softmax’ and others, to the implementation in the weeks to come.

While testing with different hyper-parameters namely i) the number of hidden layers, ii) the number of activation units in each layer, iii) the activation function and iv) the number iterations, I found the L-layer Deep Learning Network to be very sensitive to these hyper-parameters. It is not easy to tune the parameters. Adding more hidden layers, or more units per layer, does not help and mostly results in gradient descent getting stuck in some local minima. It does take a fair amount of trial and error and very close observation on how the DL network performs for logical changes. We then can zero in on the most the optimal solution. Feel free to download/fork my code from Github DeepLearning-Part 3 and play around with the hyper-parameters for your own problems.

Derivation of a Multi Layer Deep Learning Network

Note: A detailed discussion of the derivation below is available in my video presentation Neural Network 4
Lets take a simple 3 layer Neural network with 3 hidden layers and an output layer

In the forward propagation cycle the equations are

Z_{1} = W_{1}A_{0} +b_{1}  and  A_{1} = g(Z_{1})
Z_{2} = W_{2}A_{1} +b_{2}  and  A_{2} = g(Z_{2})
Z_{3} = W_{3}A_{2} +b_{3}  and A_{3} = g(Z_{3})

The loss function is given by
L = -(ylogA3 + (1-y)log(1-A3))
and dL/dA3 = -(Y/A_{3} + (1-Y)/(1-A_{3}))

For a binary classification the output activation function is the sigmoid function given by
A_{3} = 1/(1+ e^{-Z3}). It can be shown that
dA_{3}/dZ_{3} = A_{3}(1-A_3) see equation 2 in Part 1

\partial L/\partial Z_{3} = \partial L/\partial A_{3}* \partial A_{3}/\partial Z_{3} = A3-Y see equation (f) in  Part 1
and since
\partial L/\partial A_{2} = \partial L/\partial Z_{3} * \partial Z_{3}/\partial A_{2} = (A_{3} -Y) * W_{3} because \partial Z_{3}/\partial A_{2} = W_{3} -(1a)
and \partial L/\partial Z_{2} =\partial L/\partial A_{2} * \partial A_{2}/\partial Z_{2} = (A_{3} -Y) * W_{3} *g'(Z_{2}) -(1b)
\partial L/\partial W_{2} = \partial L/\partial Z_{2} * A_{1} -(1c)
since \partial Z_{2}/\partial W_{2} = A_{1}
and
\partial L/\partial b_{2} = \partial L/\partial Z_{2} -(1d)
because
\partial Z_{2}/\partial b_{2} =1

Also

\partial L/\partial A_{1} =\partial L/\partial Z_{2} * \partial Z_{2}/\partial A_{1} = \partial L/\partial Z_{2} * W_{2}     – (2a)
\partial L/\partial Z_{1} =\partial L/\partial A_{1} * \partial A_{1}/\partial Z_{1} = \partial L/\partial A_{1} * W_{2} *g'(Z_{1})          – (2b)
\partial L/\partial W_{1} = \partial L/\partial Z_{1} * A_{0} – (2c)
\partial L/\partial b_{1} = \partial L/\partial Z_{1} – (2d)

Inspecting the above equations (1a – 1d & 2a-2d), our ‘Uber deep, bottomless’ brain  can easily discern the pattern in these equations. The equation for any layer ‘l’ is of the form
Z_{l} = W_{l}A_{l-1} +b_{l}     and  A_{l} = g(Z_{l})
The equation for the backward propagation have the general form
\partial L/\partial A_{l} = \partial L/\partial Z_{l+1} * W^{l+1}
\partial L/\partial Z_{l}=\partial L/\partial A_{l} *g'(Z_{l})
\partial L/\partial W_{l} =\partial L/\partial Z_{l} *A^{l-1}
\partial L/\partial b_{l} =\partial L/\partial Z_{l}

Some other important results The derivatives of the activation functions in the implemented Deep Learning network
g(z) = sigmoid(z) = 1/(1+e^{-z}) = a g’(z) = a(1-a) – See Part 1
g(z) = tanh(z) = a g’(z) = 1 - a^{2}
g(z) = relu(z) = z  when z>0 and 0 when z 0 and 0 when z <= 0
While it appears that there is a discontinuity for the derivative at 0 the small value at the discontinuity does not present a problem

The implementation of the multi layer vectorized Deep Learning Network for Python, R and Octave is included below. For all these implementations, initially I create the size and configuration of the the Deep Learning network with the layer dimennsions So for example layersDimension Vector ‘V’ of length L indicating ‘L’ layers where

V (in Python)= [v_{0}, v_{1}, v_{2}, … v_{L-1}]
V (in R)= c(v_{1}, v_{2}, v_{3} , … v_{L})
V (in Octave)= [ v_{1} v_{2} v_{3}v_{L}]

In all of these implementations the first element is the number of input features to the Deep Learning network and the last element is always a ‘sigmoid’ activation function since all the problems deal with binary classification.

The number of elements between the first and the last element are the number of hidden layers and the magnitude of each v_{i} is the number of activation units in each hidden layer, which is specified while actually executing the Deep Learning network using the function L_Layer_DeepModel(), in all the implementations Python, R and Octave

1a. Classification with Multi layer Deep Learning Network – Relu activation(Python)

In the code below a 4 layer Neural Network is trained to generate a non-linear boundary between the classes. In the code below the ‘Relu’ Activation function is used. The number of activation units in each layer is 9. The cost vs iterations is plotted in addition to the decision boundary. Further the accuracy, precision, recall and F1 score are also computed

import os
import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import matplotlib.colors
import sklearn.linear_model

from sklearn.model_selection import train_test_split
from sklearn.datasets import make_classification, make_blobs
from matplotlib.colors import ListedColormap
import sklearn
import sklearn.datasets

#from DLfunctions import plot_decision_boundary
execfile("./DLfunctions34.py") # 
os.chdir("C:\\software\\DeepLearning-Posts\\part3")

# Create clusters of 2 classes
X1, Y1 = make_blobs(n_samples = 400, n_features = 2, centers = 9,
                       cluster_std = 1.3, random_state = 4)
#Create 2 classes
Y1=Y1.reshape(400,1)
Y1 = Y1 % 2
X2=X1.T
Y2=Y1.T
# Set the dimensions of DL Network 
#  Below we have 
#  2 - 2 input features
#  9,9 - 2 hidden layers with 9 activation units per layer and
#  1 - 1 sigmoid activation unit in the output layer as this is a binary classification
# The activation in the hidden layer is the 'relu' specified in L_Layer_DeepModel

layersDimensions = [2, 9, 9,1] #  4-layer model
parameters = L_Layer_DeepModel(X2, Y2, layersDimensions,hiddenActivationFunc='relu', learning_rate = 0.3,num_iterations = 2500, fig="fig1.png")
#Plot the decision boundary
plot_decision_boundary(lambda x: predict(parameters, x.T), X2,Y2,str(0.3),"fig2.png")

# Compute the confusion matrix
yhat = predict(parameters,X2)
from sklearn.metrics import confusion_matrix
a=confusion_matrix(Y2.T,yhat.T)
from sklearn.metrics import accuracy_score, precision_score, recall_score, f1_score
print('Accuracy: {:.2f}'.format(accuracy_score(Y2.T, yhat.T)))
print('Precision: {:.2f}'.format(precision_score(Y2.T, yhat.T)))
print('Recall: {:.2f}'.format(recall_score(Y2.T, yhat.T)))
print('F1: {:.2f}'.format(f1_score(Y2.T, yhat.T)))
## Accuracy: 0.90
## Precision: 0.91
## Recall: 0.87
## F1: 0.89

For more details on metrics like Accuracy, Recall, Precision etc. used in classification take a look at my post Practical Machine Learning with R and Python – Part 2. More details about these and other metrics besides implementation of the most common machine learning algorithms are available in my book My book ‘Practical Machine Learning with R and Python’ on Amazon

1b. Classification with Multi layer Deep Learning Network – Relu activation(R)

In the code below, binary classification is performed on the same data set as above using the Relu activation function. The DL network is same as above

library(ggplot2)
# Read the data
z <- as.matrix(read.csv("data.csv",header=FALSE)) 
x <- z[,1:2]
y <- z[,3]
X1 <- t(x)
Y1 <- t(y)

# Set the dimensions of the Deep Learning network
# No of input features =2, 2 hidden layers with 9 activation units and 1 output layer
layersDimensions = c(2, 9, 9,1)
# Execute the Deep Learning Neural Network
retvals = L_Layer_DeepModel(X1, Y1, layersDimensions,
                               hiddenActivationFunc='relu', 
                               learningRate = 0.3,
                               numIterations = 5000, 
                               print_cost = True)
library(ggplot2)
source("DLfunctions33.R")
# Get the computed costs
costs <- retvals[['costs']]
# Create a sequence of iterations
numIterations=5000
iterations <- seq(0,numIterations,by=1000)
df <-data.frame(iterations,costs)
# Plot the Costs vs number of iterations
ggplot(df,aes(x=iterations,y=costs)) + geom_point() +geom_line(color="blue") +
    xlab('No of iterations') + ylab('Cost') + ggtitle("Cost vs No of iterations")

# Plot the decision boundary
plotDecisionBoundary(z,retvals,hiddenActivationFunc="relu",0.3)

library(caret)
# Predict the output for the data values
yhat <-predict(retvals$parameters,X1,hiddenActivationFunc="relu")
yhat[yhat==FALSE]=0
yhat[yhat==TRUE]=1
# Compute the confusion matrix
confusionMatrix(yhat,Y1)
## Confusion Matrix and Statistics
## 
##           Reference
## Prediction   0   1
##          0 201  10
##          1  21 168
##                                           
##                Accuracy : 0.9225          
##                  95% CI : (0.8918, 0.9467)
##     No Information Rate : 0.555           
##     P-Value [Acc > NIR] : < 2e-16         
##                                           
##                   Kappa : 0.8441          
##  Mcnemar's Test P-Value : 0.07249         
##                                           
##             Sensitivity : 0.9054          
##             Specificity : 0.9438          
##          Pos Pred Value : 0.9526          
##          Neg Pred Value : 0.8889          
##              Prevalence : 0.5550          
##          Detection Rate : 0.5025          
##    Detection Prevalence : 0.5275          
##       Balanced Accuracy : 0.9246          
##                                           
##        'Positive' Class : 0               
## 

1c. Classification with Multi layer Deep Learning Network – Relu activation(Octave)

Included below is the code for performing classification. Incidentally Octave does not seem to have implemented the confusion matrix,  but confusionmat is available in Matlab.
# Read the data
data=csvread("data.csv");
X=data(:,1:2);
Y=data(:,3);
# Set layer dimensions
layersDimensions = [2 9 7 1] #tanh=-0.5(ok), #relu=0.1 best!
# Execute Deep Network
[weights biases costs]=L_Layer_DeepModel(X', Y', layersDimensions,
hiddenActivationFunc='relu',
learningRate = 0.1,
numIterations = 10000);
plotCostVsIterations(10000,costs);
plotDecisionBoundary(data,weights, biases,hiddenActivationFunc="tanh")


2a. Classification with Multi layer Deep Learning Network – Tanh activation(Python)

Below the Tanh activation function is used to perform the same classification. I found the Tanh activation required a simpler Neural Network of 3 layers.

# Tanh activation
import os
import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import matplotlib.colors
import sklearn.linear_model

from sklearn.model_selection import train_test_split
from sklearn.datasets import make_classification, make_blobs
from matplotlib.colors import ListedColormap
import sklearn
import sklearn.datasets

#from DLfunctions import plot_decision_boundary
os.chdir("C:\\software\\DeepLearning-Posts\\part3")
execfile("./DLfunctions34.py") 
# Create the dataset
X1, Y1 = make_blobs(n_samples = 400, n_features = 2, centers = 9,
                       cluster_std = 1.3, random_state = 4)
#Create 2 classes
Y1=Y1.reshape(400,1)
Y1 = Y1 % 2
X2=X1.T
Y2=Y1.T
# Set the dimensions of the Neural Network
layersDimensions = [2, 4, 1] #  3-layer model
# Compute the DL network
parameters = L_Layer_DeepModel(X2, Y2, layersDimensions, hiddenActivationFunc='tanh', learning_rate = .5,num_iterations = 2500,fig="fig3.png")
#Plot the decision boundary
plot_decision_boundary(lambda x: predict(parameters, x.T), X2,Y2,str(0.5),"fig4.png")

2b. Classification with Multi layer Deep Learning Network – Tanh activation(R)

R performs better with a Tanh activation than the Relu as can be seen below

 #Set the dimensions of the Neural Network
layersDimensions = c(2, 9, 9,1)
library(ggplot2)
# Read the data
z <- as.matrix(read.csv("data.csv",header=FALSE)) 
x <- z[,1:2]
y <- z[,3]
X1 <- t(x)
Y1 <- t(y)
# Execute the Deep Model
retvals = L_Layer_DeepModel(X1, Y1, layersDimensions,
                            hiddenActivationFunc='tanh', 
                            learningRate = 0.3,
                            numIterations = 5000, 
                            print_cost = True)
# Get the costs
costs <- retvals[['costs']]
iterations <- seq(0,numIterations,by=1000)
df <-data.frame(iterations,costs)
# Plot Cost vs number of iterations
ggplot(df,aes(x=iterations,y=costs)) + geom_point() +geom_line(color="blue") +
    xlab('No of iterations') + ylab('Cost') + ggtitle("Cost vs No of iterations")

#Plot the decision boundary
plotDecisionBoundary(z,retvals,hiddenActivationFunc="tanh",0.3)

2c. Classification with Multi layer Deep Learning Network – Tanh activation(Octave)

The code below uses the   Tanh activation in the hidden layers for Octave
# Read the data
data=csvread("data.csv");
X=data(:,1:2);
Y=data(:,3);
# Set layer dimensions
layersDimensions = [2 9 7 1] #tanh=-0.5(ok), #relu=0.1 best!
# Execute Deep Network
[weights biases costs]=L_Layer_DeepModel(X', Y', layersDimensions,
hiddenActivationFunc='tanh',
learningRate = 0.1,
numIterations = 10000);
plotCostVsIterations(10000,costs);
plotDecisionBoundary(data,weights, biases,hiddenActivationFunc="tanh")


3. Bernoulli’s Lemniscate

To make things  more interesting, I create a 2D figure of the Bernoulli’s lemniscate to perform non-linear classification. The Lemniscate is given by the equation
(x^{2} + y^{2})^{2} = 2a^{2}*(x^{2}-y^{2})

3a. Classifying a lemniscate with Deep Learning Network – Relu activation(Python)

import os
import numpy as np 
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
os.chdir("C:\\software\\DeepLearning-Posts\\part3")
execfile("./DLfunctions33.py") 
x1=np.random.uniform(0,10,2000).reshape(2000,1)
x2=np.random.uniform(0,10,2000).reshape(2000,1)

X=np.append(x1,x2,axis=1)
X.shape

# Create a subset of values where squared is <0,4. Perform ravel() to flatten this vector
# Create the equation
# (x^{2} + y^{2})^2 - 2a^2*(x^{2}-y^{2}) <= 0
a=np.power(np.power(X[:,0]-5,2) + np.power(X[:,1]-5,2),2)
b=np.power(X[:,0]-5,2) - np.power(X[:,1]-5,2)
c= a - (b*np.power(4,2)) <=0
Y=c.reshape(2000,1)
# Create a scatter plot of the lemniscate
plt.scatter(X[:,0], X[:,1], c=Y, marker= 'o', s=15,cmap="viridis")
Z=np.append(X,Y,axis=1)
plt.savefig("fig50.png",bbox_inches='tight')
plt.clf()

# Set the data for classification
X2=X.T
Y2=Y.T
# These settings work the best
# Set the Deep Learning layer dimensions for a Relu activation
layersDimensions = [2,7,4,1]
#Execute the DL network
parameters = L_Layer_DeepModel(X2, Y2, layersDimensions, hiddenActivationFunc='relu', learning_rate = 0.5,num_iterations = 10000, fig="fig5.png")
#Plot the decision boundary
plot_decision_boundary(lambda x: predict(parameters, x.T), X2, Y2,str(2.2),"fig6.png")

# Compute the Confusion matrix
yhat = predict(parameters,X2)
from sklearn.metrics import confusion_matrix
a=confusion_matrix(Y2.T,yhat.T)
from sklearn.metrics import accuracy_score, precision_score, recall_score, f1_score
print('Accuracy: {:.2f}'.format(accuracy_score(Y2.T, yhat.T)))
print('Precision: {:.2f}'.format(precision_score(Y2.T, yhat.T)))
print('Recall: {:.2f}'.format(recall_score(Y2.T, yhat.T)))
print('F1: {:.2f}'.format(f1_score(Y2.T, yhat.T)))
## Accuracy: 0.93
## Precision: 0.77
## Recall: 0.76
## F1: 0.76

We could get better performance by tuning further. Do play around if you fork the code.
Note:: The lemniscate data is saved as a CSV and then read in R and also in Octave. I do this instead of recreating the lemniscate shape

3b. Classifying a lemniscate with Deep Learning Network – Relu activation(R code)

The R decision boundary for the Bernoulli’s lemniscate is shown below

Z <- as.matrix(read.csv("lemniscate.csv",header=FALSE))
Z1=data.frame(Z)
# Create a scatter plot of the lemniscate
ggplot(Z1,aes(x=V1,y=V2,col=V3)) +geom_point()
#Set the data for the DL network
X=Z[,1:2]
Y=Z[,3]

X1=t(X)
Y1=t(Y)

# Set the layer dimensions for the tanh activation function
layersDimensions = c(2,5,4,1)
# Execute the Deep Learning network with Tanh activation
retvals = L_Layer_DeepModel(X1, Y1, layersDimensions, 
                               hiddenActivationFunc='tanh', 
                               learningRate = 0.3,
                               numIterations = 20000, print_cost = True)
# Plot cost vs iteration
costs <- retvals[['costs']]
numIterations = 20000
iterations <- seq(0,numIterations,by=1000)
df <-data.frame(iterations,costs)
ggplot(df,aes(x=iterations,y=costs)) + geom_point() +geom_line(color="blue") +
    xlab('No of iterations') + ylab('Cost') + ggtitle("Cost vs No of iterations")

#Plot the decision boundary
plotDecisionBoundary(Z,retvals,hiddenActivationFunc="tanh",0.3)

3c. Classifying a lemniscate with Deep Learning Network – Relu activation(Octave code)

Octave is used to generate the non-linear lemniscate boundary.

# Read the data
data=csvread("lemniscate.csv");
X=data(:,1:2);
Y=data(:,3);
# Set the dimensions of the layers
layersDimensions = [2 9 7 1]
# Compute the DL network
[weights biases costs]=L_Layer_DeepModel(X', Y', layersDimensions,
hiddenActivationFunc='relu',
learningRate = 0.20,
numIterations = 10000);
plotCostVsIterations(10000,costs);
plotDecisionBoundary(data,weights, biases,hiddenActivationFunc="relu")


4a. Binary Classification using MNIST – Python code

Finally I perform a simple classification using the MNIST handwritten digits, which according to Prof Geoffrey Hinton is “the Drosophila of Deep Learning”.

The Python code for reading the MNIST data is taken from Alex Kesling’s github link MNIST.

In the Python code below, I perform a simple binary classification between the handwritten digit ‘5’ and ‘not 5’ which is all other digits. I will perform the proper classification of all digits using the  Softmax classifier some time later.

import os
import numpy as np 
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
os.chdir("C:\\software\\DeepLearning-Posts\\part3")
execfile("./DLfunctions34.py") 
execfile("./load_mnist.py")
training=list(read(dataset='training',path="./mnist"))
test=list(read(dataset='testing',path="./mnist"))
lbls=[]
pxls=[]
print(len(training))

# Select the first 10000 training data and the labels
for i in range(10000):
       l,p=training[i]
       lbls.append(l)
       pxls.append(p)
labels= np.array(lbls)
pixels=np.array(pxls)   

#  Sey y=1  when labels == 5 and 0 otherwise
y=(labels==5).reshape(-1,1)
X=pixels.reshape(pixels.shape[0],-1)

# Create the necessary feature and target variable
X1=X.T
Y1=y.T

# Create the layer dimensions. The number of features are 28 x 28 = 784 since the 28 x 28
# pixels is flattened to single vector of length 784.
layersDimensions=[784, 15,9,7,1] # Works very well
parameters = L_Layer_DeepModel(X1, Y1, layersDimensions, hiddenActivationFunc='relu', learning_rate = 0.1,num_iterations = 1000, fig="fig7.png")

# Test data
lbls1=[]
pxls1=[]
for i in range(800):
       l,p=test[i]
       lbls1.append(l)
       pxls1.append(p)
 
testLabels=np.array(lbls1)
testData=np.array(pxls1)

ytest=(testLabels==5).reshape(-1,1)
Xtest=testData.reshape(testData.shape[0],-1)
Xtest1=Xtest.T
Ytest1=ytest.T

yhat = predict(parameters,Xtest1)
from sklearn.metrics import confusion_matrix
a=confusion_matrix(Ytest1.T,yhat.T)
from sklearn.metrics import accuracy_score, precision_score, recall_score, f1_score
print('Accuracy: {:.2f}'.format(accuracy_score(Ytest1.T, yhat.T)))
print('Precision: {:.2f}'.format(precision_score(Ytest1.T, yhat.T)))
print('Recall: {:.2f}'.format(recall_score(Ytest1.T, yhat.T)))
print('F1: {:.2f}'.format(f1_score(Ytest1.T, yhat.T)))

probs=predict_proba(parameters,Xtest1)
from sklearn.metrics import precision_recall_curve

precision, recall, thresholds = precision_recall_curve(Ytest1.T, probs.T)
closest_zero = np.argmin(np.abs(thresholds))
closest_zero_p = precision[closest_zero]
closest_zero_r = recall[closest_zero]
plt.xlim([0.0, 1.01])
plt.ylim([0.0, 1.01])
plt.plot(precision, recall, label='Precision-Recall Curve')
plt.plot(closest_zero_p, closest_zero_r, 'o', markersize = 12, fillstyle = 'none', c='r', mew=3)
plt.xlabel('Precision', fontsize=16)
plt.ylabel('Recall', fontsize=16)
plt.savefig("fig8.png",bbox_inches='tight')

## Accuracy: 0.99
## Precision: 0.96
## Recall: 0.89
## F1: 0.92

In addition to plotting the Cost vs Iterations, I also plot the Precision-Recall curve to show how the Precision and Recall, which are complementary to each other vary with respect to the other. To know more about Precision-Recall, please check my post Practical Machine Learning with R and Python – Part 4.

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4b. Binary Classification using MNIST – R code

In the R code below the same binary classification of the digit ‘5’ and the ‘not 5’ is performed. The code to read and display the MNIST data is taken from Brendan O’ Connor’s github link at MNIST

source("mnist.R")
load_mnist()
#show_digit(train$x[2,]
layersDimensions=c(784, 7,7,3,1) # Works at 1500
x <- t(train$x)
# Choose only 5000 training data
x2 <- x[,1:5000]
y <-train$y
# Set labels for all digits that are 'not 5' to 0
y[y!=5] <- 0
# Set labels of digit 5 as 1
y[y==5] <- 1
# Set the data
y1 <- as.matrix(y)
y2 <- t(y1)
# Choose the 1st 5000 data
y3 <- y2[,1:5000]

#Execute the Deep Learning Model
retvals = L_Layer_DeepModel(x2, y3, layersDimensions, 
                               hiddenActivationFunc='tanh', 
                               learningRate = 0.3,
                               numIterations = 3000, print_cost = True)
# Plot cost vs iteration
costs <- retvals[['costs']]
numIterations = 3000
iterations <- seq(0,numIterations,by=1000)
df <-data.frame(iterations,costs)
ggplot(df,aes(x=iterations,y=costs)) + geom_point() +geom_line(color="blue") +
    xlab('No of iterations') + ylab('Cost') + ggtitle("Cost vs No of iterations")

# Compute probability scores
scores <- computeScores(retvals$parameters, x2,hiddenActivationFunc='relu')
a=y3==1
b=y3==0

# Compute probabilities of class 0 and class 1
class1=scores[a]
class0=scores[b]

# Plot ROC curve
pr <-pr.curve(scores.class0=class1,
        scores.class1=class0,
       curve=T)

plot(pr)

The AUC curve hugs the top left corner and hence the performance of the classifier is quite good.

4c. Binary Classification using MNIST – Octave code

This code to load MNIST data was taken from Daniel E blog.
Precision recall curves are available in Matlab but are yet to be implemented in Octave’s statistics package.

load('./mnist/mnist.txt.gz'); % load the dataset
# Subset the 'not 5' digits
a=(trainY != 5);
# Subset '5'
b=(trainY == 5);
#make a copy of trainY
#Set 'not 5' as 0 and '5' as 1
y=trainY;
y(a)=0;
y(b)=1;
X=trainX(1:5000,:);
Y=y(1:5000);
# Set the dimensions of layer
layersDimensions=[784, 7,7,3,1];
# Compute the DL network
[weights biases costs]=L_Layer_DeepModel(X', Y', layersDimensions,
hiddenActivationFunc='relu',
learningRate = 0.1,
numIterations = 5000);

Conclusion

It was quite a challenge coding a Deep Learning Network in Python, R and Octave. The Deep Learning network implementation, in this post,is the base Deep Learning network, without any of the regularization methods included. Here are some key learning that I got while playing with different multi-layer networks on different problems

a. Deep Learning Networks come with many levers, the hyper-parameters,
– learning rate
– activation unit
– number of hidden layers
– number of units per hidden layer
– number of iterations while performing gradient descent
b. Deep Networks are very sensitive. A change in any of the hyper-parameter makes it perform very differently
c. Initially I thought adding more hidden layers, or more units per hidden layer will make the DL network better at learning. On the contrary, there is a performance degradation after the optimal DL configuration
d. At a sub-optimal number of hidden layers or number of hidden units, gradient descent seems to get stuck at a local minima
e. There were occasions when the cost came down, only to increase slowly as the number of iterations were increased. Probably early stopping would have helped.
f. I also did come across situations of ‘exploding/vanishing gradient’, cost went to Inf/-Inf. Here I would think inclusion of ‘momentum method’ would have helped

I intend to add the additional hyper-parameters of L1, L2 regularization, momentum method, early stopping etc. into the code in my future posts.
Feel free to fork/clone the code from Github Deep Learning – Part 3, and take the DL network apart and play around with it.

I will be continuing this series with more hyper-parameters to handle vanishing and exploding gradients, early stopping and regularization in the weeks to come. I also intend to add some more activation functions to this basic Multi-Layer Network.
Hang around, there are more exciting things to come.

Watch this space!

References
1. Deep Learning Specialization
2. Neural Networks for Machine Learning
3. Deep Learning, Ian Goodfellow, Yoshua Bengio and Aaron Courville
4. Neural Networks: The mechanics of backpropagation
5. Machine Learning

Also see
1.My book ‘Practical Machine Learning with R and Python’ on Amazon
2. My travels through the realms of Data Science, Machine Learning, Deep Learning and (AI)
3. Designing a Social Web Portal
4. GooglyPlus: yorkr analyzes IPL players, teams, matches with plots and tables
4. Introducing QCSimulator: A 5-qubit quantum computing simulator in R
6. Presentation on “Intelligent Networks, CAMEL protocol, services & applications
7. Design Principles of Scalable, Distributed Systems

To see all posts see Index of posts