Big Data 6: The T20 Dance of Apache NiFi and yorkpy

“I don’t count my sit-ups. I only start counting once it starts hurting. ”

Muhammad Ali

“Hard work beats talent when talent doesn’t work hard.”

Tim Notke

In my previous post Big Data 5: kNiFI-ing through cricket data with Apache NiFi and yorkpy, I created a Big Data Pipeline that takes raw data in YAML format from a Cricsheet to processing and ranking IPL T20 players. In that post I had mentioned that we could create a similar pipeline to create a real time dashboard of IPL Analytics. I could have have done this but I needed to know how to create a Web UI. After digging and poking around, I have been able to create a simple Web UI running off Apache Web server. This UI uses basic JQuery and CSS to display a real time IPL T20 dashboard. As in my previous post, this is an end-2-end Big Data pipeline which can handle large data sets at scheduled times, process them and generate real time dashboards.

We could imagine an inter-galactic T20 championship league where T20 data comes in every hour or sooner and we need to perform analytics to see if us earthlings are any better than people with pointy heads  or little green men. The NiFi pipeline could be used as-is, however the yorkpy package would have to be rewritten in Pyspark. That is in another eon, though.

My package yorkpy has around ~45+ functions which fall in the following main categories

1. Pitching yorkpy . short of good length to IPL – Part 1 :Class 1: This includes functions that convert the yaml data of IPL matches into Pandas dataframe which are then saved as CSV. This part can perform analysis of individual IPL matches.
2. Pitching yorkpy.on the middle and outside off-stump to IPL – Part 2 :Class 2:This part includes functions to create a large data frame for head-to-head confrontation between any 2IPL teams says CSK-MI, DD-KKR etc, which can be saved as CSV. Analysis is then performed on these team-2-team confrontations.
3. Pitching yorkpy.swinging away from the leg stump to IPL – Part 3 Class 3:The 3rd part includes the performance of any IPL team against all other IPL teams. The data can also be saved as CSV.
4. Pitching yorkpy … in the block hole – Part 4 :Class 4: This part performs analysis of individual IPL batsmen and bowlers

 

Watch the live demo of the end-2-end NiFi pipeline at ‘The T20 Dance

You can download the NiFi template and associated code from Github at  T20 Dance

The Apache NiFi Pipeline is shown below

1. T20 Dance – Overall NiFi Pipeline

 

There are 5 process groups

2. ListAndConvertYaml2DataFrames

This post starts with having the YAML files downloaded and unpacked from Cricsheet.  The individual YAML files are converted into Pandas dataframes and saved as CSV. A concurrency of 12 is used to increase performance and process YAML files in parallel. The processor MergeContent creates a merged content to signal the completion of conversion and triggers the other Process Groups through a funnel.

 

3. Analyse individual IPL T20 matches

This Process Group ‘Analyse T20 matches’  used the yorkpy’s Class 1 functions which can perform analysis of individual IPL T20 matches. The matchWorm() and matchScorecard() functions are used, through any other function could have been used. The Process Group is shown below

 

4. Analyse performance of an IPL team in all matches against another IPL team

This Process Group ‘Analyse performance of IPL team in all matched against another IPL team‘ does analysis in all matches between any 2 IPL teams (Class 2) as shown below

5. Analyse performance of IPL team in all matches against all other IPL teams

This uses Class 3 functions. Individual data sets for each IPL team versus all other IPL teams is created before Class 3 yorkpy functions are invoked. This is included below

6. Analyse performances of IPL batsmen and bowlers

This Process Group uses Class 4 yorkpy functions. The match CSV files are processed to get batting and bowling details before calling the individual functions as shown below

 

7. IPL T20 Dashboard

The IPL T20 Dashboard is shown

 

Conclusion

This NiFI pipeline was done for IPL T20 however, it could be done for any T20 format like Intl T20, BBL, Natwest etc which are posted in Cricsheet. Also, only a subset of the yorkpy functions were used. There is a much wider variety of functions available.

Hope the T20 dance got your foot a-tapping!

 

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2.Computer Vision: Ramblings on derivatives, histograms and contours
3.Deep Learning from first principles in Python, R and Octave – Part 6
4.A Bluemix recipe with MongoDB and Node.js
5.Practical Machine Learning with R and Python – Part 4
6.Simulating the domino effect in Android using Box2D and AndEngine

To see all posts click Index of posts

Big Data-5: kNiFi-ing through cricket data with yorkpy

“The temptation to form premature theories upon insufficient data is the bane of our profession.”

                              Sherlock Holmes in the Valley of fear by Arthur Conan Doyle

“If we have data, let’s look at data. If all we have are opinions, let’s go with mine.”

                              Jim Barksdale, former CEO Netscape 

 

In this post I use  Apache NiFi Dataflow Pipeline along with my Python package yorkpy to crunch through cricket data from Cricsheet. The Data Pipelne  flows all the way from the source  to target analytics output. Apache NiFi was created to automate the flow of data between systems.  NiFi dataflows enable the automated and managed flow of information between systems. This post automates the flow of data from Cricsheet, from where the zip file it is downloaded, unpacked, processed, transformed and finally T20 players are ranked.

While this is a straight forward example of what can be done, this pattern can be applied to real Big Data systems. For example hypothetically, we could consider that we get several parallel streams of  cricket data or for that matter any sports related data. There could be parallel Data flow pipelines that get the data from the sources. This would then be  followed by data transformation modules and finally a module for generating analytics. At the other end a UI based on AngularJS or ReactJS could display the results in a cool and awesome way.

Incidentally, the NiFi pipeline that I discuss in this post, is a simplistic example, and does not use the Big Data stack like HDFS, Hive, Spark etc. Nevertheless, the pattern used, has all the modules for a Big Data pipeline namely ingestion, unpacking, transformation and finally analytics. This NiF pipeline demonstrates the flow using the regular file system of Mac and my python based package yorkpy. The concepts mentioned could be used in a real Big Data scenario which has much fatter pipes of data coming. If  this was the case the NiFi pipeline would utilize  HDFS/Hive for storing the ingested data and Pyspark/Scala for the transformation and analytics and other related technologies.

A pictorial representation is given below

In the diagram above each of the vertical boxes could be any technology from the ever proliferating Big Data stack namely HDFS, Hive, Spark, Sqoop, Kafka, Impala and so on.  Such a dataflow automation could be created when any big sporting event happens, as long as the data generated large, and there is a need for dynamic and automated reporting. The UI could be based on AngularJS/ReactJS and could display analytical tables and charts.

This post demonstrates one such scenario in which IPL T20 data is downloaded from Cricsheet site, unpacked and stored in a specific directory. This dataflow automation is based on my yorkpy package. To know more about the yorkpy package  see Pitching yorkpy … short of good length to IPL – Part 1  and the associated parts. The zip file, from Cricsheet, contains individual IPL T20 matches in YAML format. The convertYaml2DataframeT20() function is used to convert the YAML files into Pandas dataframes before storing them as CSV files. After this done, the function rankIPLT20batting() function is used to perform the overall ranking of the T20 players. My yorkpy Python package has about ~ 50+ functions that perform various analytics on any T20 data for e.g it has the following classes of functions

  • analyze T20 matches
  • analyze performance of a T20 team in all matches against another T20 team
  • analyze performance of a T20 team against all other T20 teams
  • analyze performance of T20 batsman and bowlers
  • rank T20 batsmen and bowlers

The functions of yorkpy generate tables or charts. While this post demonstrates one scenario, we could use any of the yorkpy T20 functions, generate the output and display on a widget in the UI display, created with cool technologies like AngularJS/ReactJS,  possibly in near real time as data keeps coming in.,

To use yorkpy with NiFI the following packages have to be installed in your environment

-pip install yorkpy
-pip install pyyaml
-pip install pandas
-yum install python-devel (equivalent in Windows)
-pip install matplotlib
-pip install seaborn
-pip install sklearn
-pip install datetime

I have created a video of the NiFi Pipeline with the real dataflow fro source to the ranked IPL T20 batsmen. Take a look at RankingT20PlayersWithNiFiYorkpy

You can clone/fork the NiFi template from rankT20withNiFiYorkpy

The NiFi Data Flow Automation is shown below

1. Overall flow

The overall NiFi flow contains 2 Process Groups a) DownloadAnd Unpack. b) Convert and Rank IPL batsmen. While it appears that the Process Groups are disconnected, they are not. The first process group downloads the T20 zip file, unpacks the. zip file and saves the YAML files in a specific folder. The second process group monitors this folder and starts processing as soon the YAML files are available. It processes the YAML converting it into dataframes before storing it as CSV file. The next  processor then does the actual ranking of the batsmen before writing the output into IPLrank.txt

 

1.1 DownloadAndUnpack Process Group

This process group is shown below

 

1.1.1 GetT20Data

The GetT20Data Processor downloads the zip file given the URL

The ${T20data} variable points to the specific T20 format that needs to be downloaded. I have set this to https://cricsheet.org/downloads/ipl.zip. This could be set any other data set. In fact we could have parallel data flows for different T20/ Sports data sets and generate

1.1.2 SaveUnpackedData

This processor stores the YAML files in a predetermined folder, so that the data can be picked up  by the 2nd Process Group for processing

 

1.2 ProcessAndRankT20Players Process Group

This is the second process group which converts the YAML files to pandas dataframes before storing them as. CSV files. The RankIPLPlayers will then read all the CSV files, stack them and then proceed to rank the IPL players. The Process Group is shown below

 

1.2.1 ListFile and FetchFile Processors

The left 2 Processors ListFile and FetchFile get all the YAML files from the folder and pass it to the next processor

1.2.2 convertYaml2DataFrame Processor

The convertYaml2DataFrame Processor uses the ExecuteStreamCommand which call a python script. The Python script invoked the yorkpy function convertYaml2Dataframe() as shown below

The ${convertYaml2Dataframe} variable points to the python file below which invoked the yorkpy function yka.convertYaml2PandasDataframeT20()

import yorkpy.analytics as yka
import argparse
parser = argparse.ArgumentParser(description='convert')
parser.add_argument("yamlFile",help="YAML File")
args=parser.parse_args()
yamlFile=args.yamlFile
yka.convertYaml2PandasDataframeT20(yamlFile,"/Users/tvganesh/backup/software/nifi/ipl","/Users/tvganesh/backup/software/nifi/ipldata")

This function takes as input $filename which comes from FetchFile processor which is a FlowFile. So I have added a concurrency of 8  to handle upto 8 Flowfiles at a time. The thumb rule as I read on the internet is 2x, 4x the number of cores of your system. Since I have an 8 core Mac, I could possibly have gone ~ 30 concurrent threads. Also the number of concurrent threads is less when the flow is run in a Oracle Box VirtualMachine. Box since a vCore < actual Core

The scheduling tab is as below

Here are the 8 concurrent Python threads on Mac at bottom right… (pretty cool!)

I have not fully tested how latency vs throughput slider changes, affects the performance.

1.2.3 MergeContent Processor

This processor’s only job is to trigger the rankIPLPlayers when all the FlowFiles have merged into 1 file.

1.2.4 RankT20Players

This processor is an ExecuteStreamCommand Processor that executes a Python script which invokes a yorkpy function rankIPLT20Batting()

import yorkpy.analytics as yka
rank=yka.rankIPLT20Batting("/Users/tvganesh/backup/software/nifi/ipldata")
print(rank.head(15))

1.2.5 OutputRankofT20Player Processor

This processor writes the generated rank to an output file.

1.3 Final Ranking of IPL T20 players

The Nodejs based web server picks up this file and displays on the web page the final ranks (the code is based on a good youtube for reading from file)

 

2. Final thoughts

As I have mentioned above though the above NiFi Cricket Dataflow automation does not use the Hadoop ecosystem, the pattern used is valid and can be used with some customization in Big Data flows as parallel stream. I could have also done this on Oracle VirtualBox but I thought since the code is based on Python and Pandas there is no real advantage of running on the VirtualBox.  GIve the NiFi flow a shot. Have fun!!!

Also see
1.My book ‘Deep Learning from first Practical Machine Learning with R and Python – Part 5
Edition’ now on Amazon

2. Introducing QCSimulator: A 5-qubit quantum computing simulator in R
3.De-blurring revisited with Wiener filter using OpenCV
4. Practical Machine Learning with R and Python – Part 5
5. Natural language processing: What would Shakespeare say?
6.Getting started with Tensorflow, Keras in Python and R
7.Revisiting World Bank data analysis with WDI and gVisMotionChart

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Updated:Analyzing performance of cricketers and cricket teams with cricketr templates

Note: I have included the latest set of functions that perform granular analysis of batsmen and bowlers to the cricketr template below! You can download this RMarkdown file from Github at cricketr-template 

This post includes a template which you can use for analyzing the performances of cricketers, both batsmen and bowlers in Test, ODI and Twenty 20 cricket. Additionally this template can also be used for analyzing performancs of teams in Test, ODI and T20 matches using my R package cricketr. To see actual usage of functions related to players in the R package cricketr see Introducing cricketr! : An R package to analyze performances of cricketers and associated posts on cricket in Index of posts. For the analyses on team performances see https://gigadom.in/2019/06/21/cricpy-adds-team-analytics-to-its-repertoire/

The ‘cricketr’ package uses the statistics info available in ESPN Cricinfo Statsguru. The current version of this package supports all formats of the game including Test, ODI and Twenty20 versions.

You should be able to install the package from GitHub and use the many functions available in the package. Please mindful of the ESPN Cricinfo Terms of Use

Take a look at my short video tutorial on my R package cricketr on Youtube – R package cricketr – A short tutorial

Do check out my interactive Shiny app implementation using the cricketr package – Sixer – R package cricketr’s new Shiny avatar

The cricketr package

The cricketr package has several functions that perform several different analyses on both batsman and bowlers. The package can also analyze performances of teams The package has function that plot percentage frequency runs or wickets, runs likelihood for a batsman, relative run/strike rates of batsman and relative performance/economy rate for bowlers are available. Other interesting functions include batting performance moving average, forecast and a function to check whether the batsmans in in-form or out-of-form.

In addition performances of teams against different oppositions at different venues can be computed and plotted. The timeline of wins & losses can be plotted.

A. Performances of batsmen and bowlers

The data for a particular player can be obtained with the getPlayerData() function. To do you will need to go to ESPN CricInfo Player and type in the name of the player for e.g Ricky Ponting, Sachin Tendulkar etc. This will bring up a page which have the profile number for the player e.g. for Sachin Tendulkar this would be http://www.espncricinfo.com/india/content/player/35320.html. Hence, Sachin’s profile is 35320. This can be used to get the data for Tendulkar as shown below

The cricketr package is now available from CRAN!!! You should be able to install directly with

1. Install the cricketr package

if (!require("cricketr")){
    install.packages("cricketr",lib = "c:/test")
}
library(cricketr)

The cricketr package includes some pre-packaged sample (.csv) files. You can use these sample to test functions as shown below

# Retrieve the file path of a data file installed with cricketr
#pathToFile <- system.file("data", "tendulkar.csv", package = "cricketr")
#batsman4s(pathToFile, "Sachin Tendulkar")

# The general format is pkg-function(pathToFile,par1,...)
#batsman4s(<path-To-File>,"Sachin Tendulkar")

“` The pre-packaged files can be accessed as shown above. To get the data of any player use the function in Test, ODI and Twenty20 use the following

2. For Test cricket

#tendulkar <- getPlayerData(35320,dir="..",file="tendulkar.csv",type="batting",homeOrAway=c(1,2), result=c(1,2,4))

2a. For ODI cricket

#tendulkarOD <- getPlayerDataOD(35320,dir="..",file="tendulkarOD.csv",type="batting")

2b For Twenty 20 cricket

#tendulkarT20 <- getPlayerDataTT(35320,dir="..",file="tendulkarT20.csv",type="batting")

Important Note 1 This needs to be done only once for a player. This function stores the player’s data in a CSV file (for e.g. tendulkar.csv as above) which can then be reused for all other functions. Once we have the data for the players many analyses can be done. This post will use the stored CSV file obtained with a prior getPlayerData for all subsequent analyses

Important Note 2 The same set of functions can be used for Tests, ODI and T20s. I have mentioned wherever you may need special functions for ODI and T20 below

Sachin Tendulkar’s performance – Basic Analyses

The 3 plots below provide the following for Tendulkar

  1. Frequency percentage of runs in each run range over the whole career
  2. Mean Strike Rate for runs scored in the given range
  3. A histogram of runs frequency percentages in runs ranges For example

3. Basic analyses

par(mfrow=c(1,3))
par(mar=c(4,4,2,2))
#batsmanRunsFreqPerf("./tendulkar.csv","Tendulkar")
#batsmanMeanStrikeRate("./tendulkar.csv","Tendulkar")
#batsmanRunsRanges("./tendulkar.csv","Tendulkar")
dev.off()
## null device 
##           1
  1. Player 1
  2. Player 2
  3. Player 3
  4. Player 4

4. More analyses

par(mfrow=c(1,3))
par(mar=c(4,4,2,2))
#batsman4s("./player1.csv","Player1")
#batsman6s("./player1.csv","Player1")
#batsmanMeanStrikeRate("./player1.csv","Player1")

# For ODI and T20
#batsmanScoringRateODTT("./player1.csv","Player1")
dev.off()
## null device 
##           1
par(mfrow=c(1,3))
par(mar=c(4,4,2,2))
#batsman4s("./player2.csv","Player2")
#batsman6s("./player2.csv","Player2")
#batsmanMeanStrikeRate("./player2.csv","Player2")
# For ODI and T20
#batsmanScoringRateODTT("./player1.csv","Player1")
dev.off()
## null device 
##           1
par(mfrow=c(1,3))
par(mar=c(4,4,2,2))
#batsman4s("./player3.csv","Player3")
#batsman6s("./player3.csv","Player3")
#batsmanMeanStrikeRate("./player3.csv","Player3")
# For ODI and T20
#batsmanScoringRateODTT("./player1.csv","Player1")

dev.off()
## null device 
##           1
par(mfrow=c(1,3))
par(mar=c(4,4,2,2))
#batsman4s("./player4.csv","Player4")
#batsman6s("./player4.csv","Player4")
#batsmanMeanStrikeRate("./player4.csv","Player4")
# For ODI and T20
#batsmanScoringRateODTT("./player1.csv","Player1")
dev.off()
## null device 
##           1

Note: For mean strike rate in ODI and Twenty20 use the function batsmanScoringRateODTT()

5.Boxplot histogram plot

This plot shows a combined boxplot of the Runs ranges and a histogram of the Runs Frequency

#batsmanPerfBoxHist("./player1.csv","Player1")
#batsmanPerfBoxHist("./player2.csv","Player2")
#batsmanPerfBoxHist("./player3.csv","Player3")
#batsmanPerfBoxHist("./player4.csv","Player4")

6. Contribution to won and lost matches

For the 2 functions below you will have to use the getPlayerDataSp() function. I have commented this as I already have these files. This function can only be used for Test matches

#player1sp <- getPlayerDataSp(xxxx,tdir=".",tfile="player1sp.csv",ttype="batting")
#player2sp <- getPlayerDataSp(xxxx,tdir=".",tfile="player2sp.csv",ttype="batting")
#player3sp <- getPlayerDataSp(xxxx,tdir=".",tfile="player3sp.csv",ttype="batting")
#player4sp <- getPlayerDataSp(xxxx,tdir=".",tfile="player4sp.csv",ttype="batting")
par(mfrow=c(2,2))
par(mar=c(4,4,2,2))
#batsmanContributionWonLost("player1sp.csv","Player1")
#batsmanContributionWonLost("player2sp.csv","Player2")
#batsmanContributionWonLost("player3sp.csv","Player3")
#batsmanContributionWonLost("player4sp.csv","Player4")
dev.off()
## null device 
##           1

7, Performance at home and overseas

This function also requires the use of getPlayerDataSp() as shown above. This can only be used for Test matches

par(mfrow=c(2,2))
par(mar=c(4,4,2,2))
#batsmanPerfHomeAway("player1sp.csv","Player1")
#batsmanPerfHomeAway("player2sp.csv","Player2")
#batsmanPerfHomeAway("player3sp.csv","Player3")
#batsmanPerfHomeAway("player4sp.csv","Player4")
dev.off()
## null device 
##           1

8. Batsman average at different venues

par(mfrow=c(2,2))
par(mar=c(4,4,2,2))
#batsmanAvgRunsGround("./player1.csv","Player1")
#batsmanAvgRunsGround("./player2.csv","Player2")
#batsmanAvgRunsGround("./player3.csv","Ponting")
#batsmanAvgRunsGround("./player4.csv","Player4")
dev.off()
## null device 
##           1

9. Batsman average against different opposition

par(mfrow=c(2,2))
par(mar=c(4,4,2,2))
#batsmanAvgRunsOpposition("./player1.csv","Player1")
#batsmanAvgRunsOpposition("./player2.csv","Player2")
#batsmanAvgRunsOpposition("./player3.csv","Ponting")
#batsmanAvgRunsOpposition("./player4.csv","Player4")
dev.off()
## null device 
##           1

10. Runs Likelihood of batsman

par(mfrow=c(2,2))
par(mar=c(4,4,2,2))
#batsmanRunsLikelihood("./player1.csv","Player1")
#batsmanRunsLikelihood("./player2.csv","Player2")
#batsmanRunsLikelihood("./player3.csv","Ponting")
#batsmanRunsLikelihood("./player4.csv","Player4")
dev.off()
## null device 
##           1

11. Moving Average of runs in career

par(mfrow=c(2,2))
par(mar=c(4,4,2,2))
#batsmanMovingAverage("./player1.csv","Player1")
#batsmanMovingAverage("./player2.csv","Player2")
#batsmanMovingAverage("./player3.csv","Ponting")
#batsmanMovingAverage("./player4.csv","Player4")
dev.off()
## null device 
##           1

12. Cumulative Average runs of batsman in career

par(mfrow=c(2,2))
par(mar=c(4,4,2,2))
#batsmanCumulativeAverageRuns("./player1.csv","Player1")
#batsmanCumulativeAverageRuns("./player2.csv","Player2")
#batsmanCumulativeAverageRuns("./player3.csv","Ponting")
#batsmanCumulativeAverageRuns("./player4.csv","Player4")
dev.off()
## null device 
##           1

13. Cumulative Average strike rate of batsman in career

par(mfrow=c(2,2))
par(mar=c(4,4,2,2))
#batsmanCumulativeStrikeRate("./player1.csv","Player1")
#batsmanCumulativeStrikeRate("./player2.csv","Player2")
#batsmanCumulativeStrikeRate("./player3.csv","Ponting")
#batsmanCumulativeStrikeRate("./player4.csv","Player4")
dev.off()
## null device 
##           1

14. Future Runs forecast

Here are plots that forecast how the batsman will perform in future. In this case 90% of the career runs trend is uses as the training set. the remaining 10% is the test set.

A Holt-Winters forecating model is used to forecast future performance based on the 90% training set. The forecated runs trend is plotted. The test set is also plotted to see how close the forecast and the actual matches

Take a look at the runs forecasted for the batsman below.

par(mfrow=c(2,2))
par(mar=c(4,4,2,2))
#batsmanPerfForecast("./player1.csv","Player1")
#batsmanPerfForecast("./player2.csv","Player2")
#batsmanPerfForecast("./player3.csv","Player3")
#batsmanPerfForecast("./player4.csv","Player4")
dev.off()
## null device 
##           1

15. Relative Mean Strike Rate plot

The plot below compares the Mean Strike Rate of the batsman for each of the runs ranges of 10 and plots them. The plot indicate the following

frames <- list("./player1.csv","./player2.csv","player3.csv","player4.csv")
names <- list("Player1","Player2","Player3","Player4")
#relativeBatsmanSR(frames,names)

16. Relative Runs Frequency plot

The plot below gives the relative Runs Frequency Percetages for each 10 run bucket. The plot below show

frames <- list("./player1.csv","./player2.csv","player3.csv","player4.csv")
names <- list("Player1","Player2","Player3","Player4")
#relativeRunsFreqPerf(frames,names)

17. Relative cumulative average runs in career

frames <- list("./player1.csv","./player2.csv","player3.csv","player4.csv")
names <- list("Player1","Player2","Player3","Player4")
#relativeBatsmanCumulativeAvgRuns(frames,names)

18. Relative cumulative average strike rate in career

frames <- list("./player1.csv","./player2.csv","player3.csv","player4.csv")
names <- list("Player1","Player2","Player3","player4")
#relativeBatsmanCumulativeStrikeRate(frames,names)

19. Check Batsman In-Form or Out-of-Form

The below computation uses Null Hypothesis testing and p-value to determine if the batsman is in-form or out-of-form. For this 90% of the career runs is chosen as the population and the mean computed. The last 10% is chosen to be the sample set and the sample Mean and the sample Standard Deviation are caculated.

The Null Hypothesis (H0) assumes that the batsman continues to stay in-form where the sample mean is within 95% confidence interval of population mean The Alternative (Ha) assumes that the batsman is out of form the sample mean is beyond the 95% confidence interval of the population mean.

A significance value of 0.05 is chosen and p-value us computed If p-value >= .05 – Batsman In-Form If p-value < 0.05 – Batsman Out-of-Form

Note Ideally the p-value should be done for a population that follows the Normal Distribution. But the runs population is usually left skewed. So some correction may be needed. I will revisit this later

This is done for the Top 4 batsman

#checkBatsmanInForm("./player1.csv","Player1")
#checkBatsmanInForm("./player2.csv","Player2")
#checkBatsmanInForm("./player3.csv","Player3")
#checkBatsmanInForm("./player4.csv","Player4")

20. 3D plot of Runs vs Balls Faced and Minutes at Crease

The plot is a scatter plot of Runs vs Balls faced and Minutes at Crease. A prediction plane is fitted

par(mfrow=c(1,2))
par(mar=c(4,4,2,2))
#battingPerf3d("./player1.csv","Player1")
#battingPerf3d("./player2.csv","Player2")
par(mfrow=c(1,2))
par(mar=c(4,4,2,2))
#battingPerf3d("./player3.csv","Player3")
#battingPerf3d("./player4.csv","player4")
dev.off()
## null device 
##           1

21. Predicting Runs given Balls Faced and Minutes at Crease

A multi-variate regression plane is fitted between Runs and Balls faced +Minutes at crease.

BF <- seq( 10, 400,length=15)
Mins <- seq(30,600,length=15)
newDF <- data.frame(BF,Mins)
#Player1 <- batsmanRunsPredict("./player1.csv","Player1",newdataframe=newDF)
#Player2 <- batsmanRunsPredict("./player2.csv","Player2",newdataframe=newDF)
#ponting <- batsmanRunsPredict("./player3.csv","Player3",newdataframe=newDF)
#sangakkara <- batsmanRunsPredict("./player4.csv","Player4",newdataframe=newDF)
#batsmen <-cbind(round(Player1$Runs),round(Player2$Runs),round(Player3$Runs),round(Player4$Runs))
#colnames(batsmen) <- c("Player1","Player2","Player3","Player4")
#newDF <- data.frame(round(newDF$BF),round(newDF$Mins))
#colnames(newDF) <- c("BallsFaced","MinsAtCrease")
#predictedRuns <- cbind(newDF,batsmen)
#predictedRuns

Analysis of bowlers

  1. Bowler1
  2. Bowler2
  3. Bowler3
  4. Bowler4

player1 <- getPlayerData(xxxx,dir=“..”,file=“player1.csv”,type=“bowling”) Note For One day you will have to use getPlayerDataOD() and for Twenty20 it is getPlayerDataTT()

21. Wicket Frequency Plot

This plot below computes the percentage frequency of number of wickets taken for e.g 1 wicket x%, 2 wickets y% etc and plots them as a continuous line

par(mfrow=c(1,3))
par(mar=c(4,4,2,2))
#bowlerWktsFreqPercent("./bowler1.csv","Bowler1")
#bowlerWktsFreqPercent("./bowler2.csv","Bowler2")
#bowlerWktsFreqPercent("./bowler3.csv","Bowler3")
dev.off()
## null device 
##           1

22. Wickets Runs plot

par(mfrow=c(1,3))
par(mar=c(4,4,2,2))
#bowlerWktsRunsPlot("./bowler1.csv","Bowler1")
#bowlerWktsRunsPlot("./bowler2.csv","Bowler2")
#bowlerWktsRunsPlot("./bowler3.csv","Bowler3")
dev.off()
## null device 
##           1

23. Average wickets at different venues

#bowlerAvgWktsGround("./bowler3.csv","Bowler3")

24. Average wickets against different opposition

#bowlerAvgWktsOpposition("./bowler3.csv","Bowler3")

25. Wickets taken moving average

par(mfrow=c(1,3))
par(mar=c(4,4,2,2))
#bowlerMovingAverage("./bowler1.csv","Bowler1")
#bowlerMovingAverage("./bowler2.csv","Bowler2")
#bowlerMovingAverage("./bowler3.csv","Bowler3")

dev.off()
## null device 
##           1

26. Cumulative Wickets taken

par(mfrow=c(1,3))
par(mar=c(4,4,2,2))
#bowlerCumulativeAvgWickets("./bowler1.csv","Bowler1")
#bowlerCumulativeAvgWickets("./bowler2.csv","Bowler2")
#bowlerCumulativeAvgWickets("./bowler3.csv","Bowler3")
dev.off()
## null device 
##           1

27. Cumulative Economy rate

par(mfrow=c(1,3))
par(mar=c(4,4,2,2))
#bowlerCumulativeAvgEconRate("./bowler1.csv","Bowler1")
#bowlerCumulativeAvgEconRate("./bowler2.csv","Bowler2")
#bowlerCumulativeAvgEconRate("./bowler3.csv","Bowler3")
dev.off()
## null device 
##           1

28. Future Wickets forecast

Here are plots that forecast how the bowler will perform in future. In this case 90% of the career wickets trend is used as the training set. the remaining 10% is the test set.

A Holt-Winters forecating model is used to forecast future performance based on the 90% training set. The forecated wickets trend is plotted. The test set is also plotted to see how close the forecast and the actual matches

par(mfrow=c(1,3))
par(mar=c(4,4,2,2))
#bowlerPerfForecast("./bowler1.csv","Bowler1")
#bowlerPerfForecast("./bowler2.csv","Bowler2")
#bowlerPerfForecast("./bowler3.csv","Bowler3")
dev.off()
## null device 
##           1

29. Contribution to matches won and lost

As discussed above the next 2 charts require the use of getPlayerDataSp(). This can only be done for Test matches

#bowler1sp <- getPlayerDataSp(xxxx,tdir=".",tfile="bowler1sp.csv",ttype="bowling")
#bowler2sp <- getPlayerDataSp(xxxx,tdir=".",tfile="bowler2sp.csv",ttype="bowling")
#bowler3sp <- getPlayerDataSp(xxxx,tdir=".",tfile="bowler3sp.csv",ttype="bowling")
par(mfrow=c(1,3))
par(mar=c(4,4,2,2))
#bowlerContributionWonLost("bowler1sp","Bowler1")
#bowlerContributionWonLost("bowler2sp","Bowler2")
#bowlerContributionWonLost("bowler3sp","Bowler3")
dev.off()
## null device 
##           1

30. Performance home and overseas.

This can only be done for Test matches

par(mfrow=c(1,3))
par(mar=c(4,4,2,2))
#bowlerPerfHomeAway("bowler1sp","Bowler1")
#bowlerPerfHomeAway("bowler2sp","Bowler2")
#bowlerPerfHomeAway("bowler3sp","Bowler3")
dev.off()
## null device 
##           1

31 Relative Wickets Frequency Percentage

frames <- list("./bowler1.csv","./bowler3.csv","bowler2.csv")
names <- list("Bowler1","Bowler3","Bowler2")
#relativeBowlingPerf(frames,names)

32 Relative Economy Rate against wickets taken

frames <- list("./bowler1.csv","./bowler3.csv","bowler2.csv")
names <- list("Bowler1","Bowler3","Bowler2")
#relativeBowlingER(frames,names)

33 Relative cumulative average wickets of bowlers in career

frames <- list("./bowler1.csv","./bowler3.csv","bowler2.csv")
names <- list("Bowler1","Bowler3","Bowler2")
#relativeBowlerCumulativeAvgWickets(frames,names)

34 Relative cumulative average economy rate of bowlers

frames <- list("./bowler1.csv","./bowler3.csv","bowler2.csv")
names <- list("Bowler1","Bowler3","Bowler2")
#relativeBowlerCumulativeAvgEconRate(frames,names)

35 Check for bowler in-form/out-of-form

The below computation uses Null Hypothesis testing and p-value to determine if the bowler is in-form or out-of-form. For this 90% of the career wickets is chosen as the population and the mean computed. The last 10% is chosen to be the sample set and the sample Mean and the sample Standard Deviation are caculated.

The Null Hypothesis (H0) assumes that the bowler continues to stay in-form where the sample mean is within 95% confidence interval of population mean The Alternative (Ha) assumes that the bowler is out of form the sample mean is beyond the 95% confidence interval of the population mean.

A significance value of 0.05 is chosen and p-value us computed If p-value >= .05 – Batsman In-Form If p-value < 0.05 – Batsman Out-of-Form

Note Ideally the p-value should be done for a population that follows the Normal Distribution. But the runs population is usually left skewed. So some correction may be needed. I will revisit this later

Note: The check for the form status of the bowlers indicate

#checkBowlerInForm("./bowler1.csv","Bowler1")
#checkBowlerInForm("./bowler2.csv","Bowler2")
#checkBowlerInForm("./bowler3.csv","Bowler3")
dev.off()
## null device 
##           1

36. Performing granular analysis of batsmen and bowlers

To perform granular analysis of batsmen and bowlers do the following 2 steps

  1. Step 1: getPlayerDataHA – This function is a wrapper around getPlayerData(), getPlayerDataOD() and getPlayerDataTT(), and adds an extra column ‘homeOrAway’ which says whether the match was played at home/away/neutral venues. A CSV file is created with this new column.
  2. Step2:getPlayerDataOppnHA – This function allows you to slice & dice the data for batsmen and bowlers against specific oppositions, at home/away/neutral venues and between certain periods. This reduced subset of data can be used to perform analyses. A CSV file is created as an output based on the parameters of opposition, home or away and the interval of time

See Cricketr learns new tricks : Performs fine-grained analysis of players

37. GetPlayerDataHA (Batsmen, Tests)

#This saves a file playerTestHA.csv
#df=getPlayerDataHA(<profileNo>,tfile="playerTestHA.csv",type="batting", matchType="Test")

#Use the generate file to create a subset of data
#df1=getPlayerDataOppnHA(infile="playerTestHA.csv",outfile="playerTestFile1.csv",
#                         startDate=<start Date>,endDate=<end Date>)

38. GetPlayerDataHA (Bowlers, Tests)

#This saves a file playerTestHA.csv
#df=getPlayerDataHA(<profileNo>,tfile="playerTestHA.csv",type="bowling", matchType="Test")

#Use the generate file to create a subset of data
#df1=getPlayerDataOppnHA(infile="playerTestHA.csv",outfile="playerTestFile1.csv",
#                         startDate=<start Date>,endDate=<end Date>)

39. GetPlayerDataHA (Batsmen, ODI)

#This saves a file playerTestHA.csv
#df=getPlayerDataHA(<profileNo>,tfile="playerODIHA.csv",type="batting", matchType="ODI")

#Use the generate file to create a subset of data
#df1=getPlayerDataOppnHA(infile="playerODIHA.csv",outfile="playerODIFile1.csv",
#                         startDate=<start Date>,endDate=<end Date>)

40. GetPlayerDataHA (Bowlers, ODI)

#This saves a file playerTestHA.csv
#df=getPlayerDataHA(<profileNo>,tfile="playerODIHA.csv",type="bowling", matchType="ODI")

#Use the generate file to create a subset of data
#df1=getPlayerDataOppnHA(infile="playerODIHA.csv",outfile="playerODIFile1.csv",
#                         startDate=<start Date>,endDate=<end Date>)

41. GetPlayerDataHA (Batsmen, T20)

#This saves a file playerTestHA.csv
#df=getPlayerDataHA(<profileNo>,tfile="playerT20HA.csv",type="batting", matchType="T20")

#Use the generate file to create a subset of data
#df1=getPlayerDataOppnHA(infile="playerT20HA.csv",outfile="playerT20File1.csv",
#                         startDate=<start Date>,endDate=<end Date>)

42. GetPlayerDataHA (Bowlers, T20)

#This saves a file playerTestHA.csv
#df=getPlayerDataHA(<profileNo>,tfile="playerT20HA.csv",type="bowling", matchType="T20")

#Use the generate file to create a subset of data
#df1=getPlayerDataOppnHA(infile="playerT20HA.csv",outfile="playerT20File1.csv",
#                         startDate=<start Date>,endDate=<end Date>)

Important Note Once you get the subset of data for batsmen and bowlers playerTestFile1.csv, playerODIFile1.csv or playerT20File1.csv , you can use any of the cricketr functions on the subset of data for a fine-grained analysis

8. Performances of teams

The following functions will get the team data for Tests, ODI and T20s

1a. Get Test team data

#country1Test= getTeamDataHomeAway(dir=".",teamView="bat",matchType="Test",file="country1Test.csv",save=True,teamName="Country1")
#country2Test= getTeamDataHomeAway(dir=".",teamView="bat",matchType="Test",file="country2Test.csv",save=True,teamName="Country2")
#country3Test= getTeamDataHomeAway(dir=".",teamView="bat",matchType="Test",file="country3Test.csv",save=True,teamName="Country3")

1b. Get ODI team data

#team1ODI=  getTeamDataHomeAway(dir=".",matchType="ODI",file="team1ODI.csv",save=True,teamName="team1")
#team2ODI=  getTeamDataHomeAway(dir=".",matchType="ODI",file="team2ODI.csv",save=True,teamName="team2")
#team3ODI=  getTeamDataHomeAway(dir=".",matchType="ODI",file="team3ODI.csv",save=True,teamName="team3")

1c. Get T20 team data

#team1T20 = getTeamDataHomeAway(matchType="T20",file="team1T20.csv",save=True,teamName="team1")
#team2T20 = getTeamDataHomeAway(matchType="T20",file="team2T20.csv",save=True,teamName="team2")
#team3T20 = getTeamDataHomeAway(matchType="T20",file="team3T20.csv",save=True,teamName="team3")

2a. Test – Analyzing test performances against opposition

# Get the performance of Indian test team against all teams at all venues as a dataframe
#df <- teamWinLossStatusVsOpposition("country1Test.csv",teamName="Country1",opposition=c("all"),homeOrAway=c("all"),matchType="Test",plot=FALSE)
#head(df)

# Plot the performance of Country1 Test team  against all teams at all venues
#teamWinLossStatusVsOpposition("country1Test.csv",teamName="Country1",opposition=c("all"),homeOrAway=c("all"),matchType="Test",plot=TRUE)

# Plot the performance of Country1 Test team  against specific teams at home/away venues
#teamWinLossStatusVsOpposition("country1Test.csv",teamName="Country1",opposition=c("Country2","Country3","Country4"),homeOrAway=c("home","away","neutral"),matchType="Test",plot=TRUE)

2b. Test – Analyzing test performances against opposition at different grounds

# Get the performance of Indian test team against all teams at all venues as a dataframe
#df <- teamWinLossStatusAtGrounds("country1Test.csv",teamName="Country1",opposition=c("all"),homeOrAway=c("all"),matchType="Test",plot=FALSE)
#head(df)

# Plot the performance of Country1 Test team  against all teams at all venues
#teamWinLossStatusAtGrounds("country1Test.csv",teamName="Country1",opposition=c("all"),homeOrAway=c("all"),matchType="Test",plot=TRUE)

# Plot the performance of Country1 Test team  against specific teams at home/away venues
#teamWinLossStatusAtGrounds("country1Test.csv",teamName="Country1",opposition=c("Country2","Country3","Country4"),homeOrAway=c("home","away","neutral"),matchType="Test",plot=TRUE)

2c. Test – Plot time lines of wins and losses

#plotTimelineofWinsLosses("country1Test.csv",team="Country1",opposition=c("all"), #startDate="1970-01-01",endDate="2017-01-01")
#plotTimelineofWinsLosses("country1Test.csv",team="Country1",opposition=c("Country2","Count#ry3","Country4"), homeOrAway=c("home",away","neutral"), startDate=<start Date> #,endDate=<endDate>)

3a. ODI – Analyzing test performances against opposition

#df <- teamWinLossStatusVsOpposition("team1ODI.csv",teamName="Team1",opposition=c("all"),homeOrAway=c("all"),matchType="ODI",plot=FALSE)
#head(df)

# Plot the performance of team1  in ODIs against Sri Lanka, India at all venues
#teamWinLossStatusVsOpposition("team1ODI.csv",teamName="Team1",opposition=c("all"),homeOrAway=c(all"),matchType="ODI",plot=TRUE)

# Plot the performance of Team1 ODI team  against specific teams at home/away venues
#teamWinLossStatusVsOpposition("team1ODI.csv",teamName="Team1",opposition=c("Team2","Team3","Team4"),homeOrAway=c("home","away","neutral"),matchType="ODI",plot=TRUE)

3b. ODI – Analyzing test performances against opposition at different venues

#df <- teamWinLossStatusAtGrounds("team1ODI.csv",teamName="Team1",opposition=c("all"),homeOrAway=c("all"),matchType="ODI",plot=FALSE)
#head(df)

# Plot the performance of Team1s in ODIs specific ODI teams at all venues
#teamWinLossStatusAtGrounds("team1ODI.csv",teamName="Team1",opposition=c("all"),homeOrAway=c(all"),matchType="ODI",plot=TRUE)

# Plot the performance of Team1 against specific ODI teams at home/away venues
#teamWinLossStatusAtGrounds("team1ODI.csv",teamName="Team1",opposition=c("Team2","Team3","Team4"),homeOrAway=c("home","away","neutral"),matchType="ODI",plot=TRUE)

3c. ODI – Plot time lines of wins and losses

#Plot the time line of wins/losses of Bangladesh ODI team between 2 dates all venues
#plotTimelineofWinsLosses("team1ODI.csv",team="Team1",startDate=<start date> ,endDa#te=<end date>,matchType="ODI")

#Plot the time line of wins/losses against specific opposition between 2 dates
#plotTimelineofWinsLosses("team1ODI.csv",team="Team1",opposition=c("Team2","Team2"), homeOrAway=c("home",away","neutral"), startDate=<start date>,endDate=<end date> ,matchType="ODI")

4a. T20 – Analyzing test performances against opposition

#df <- teamWinLossStatusVsOpposition("teamT20.csv",teamName="Team1",opposition=c("all"),homeOrAway=c("all"),matchType="T20",plot=FALSE)
#head(df)

# Plot the performance of Team1 in T20s  against  all opposition at all venues
#teamWinLossStatusVsOpposition("teamT20.csv",teamName="Team1",opposition=c("all"),homeOrAway=c(all"),matchType="T20",plot=TRUE)

# Plot the performance of T20 Test team  against specific teams at home/away venues
#teamWinLossStatusVsOpposition("teamT20.csv",teamName="Team1",opposition=c("Team2","Team3","Team4"),homeOrAway=c("home","away","neutral"),matchType="T20",plot=TRUE)

4b. T20 – Analyzing test performances against opposition at different venues

#df <- teamWinLossStatusAtGrounds("teamT20.csv",teamName="Team1",opposition=c("all"),homeOrAway=c("all"),matchType="T20",plot=FALSE)
#head(df)

# Plot the performance of Team1s in ODIs specific ODI teams at all venues
#teamWinLossStatusAtGrounds("teamT20.csv",teamName="Team1",opposition=c("all"),homeOrAway=c(all"),matchType="T20",plot=TRUE)

# Plot the performance of Team1 against specific ODI teams at home/away venues
#teamWinLossStatusAtGrounds("teamT20.csv",teamName="Team1",opposition=c("Team2","Team3","Team4"),homeOrAway=c("home","away","neutral"),matchType="T20",plot=TRUE)

4c. T20 – Plot time lines of wins and losses

#Plot the time line of wins/losses of Bangladesh ODI team between 2 dates all venues
#plotTimelineofWinsLosses("teamT20.csv",team="Team1",startDate=<start date> ,endDa#te=<end date>,matchType="T20")

#Plot the time line of wins/losses against specific opposition between 2 dates
#plotTimelineofWinsLosses("teamT20.csv",team="Team1",opposition=c("Team2","Team2"), homeOrAway=c("home",away","neutral"), startDate=<start date>,endDate=<end date> ,matchType="T20")

Key Findings

Analysis of batsman

Analysis of bowlers

Analysis of teams

Conclusion

Using the above template, analysis can be done for both batsmen and bowlers in Test, ODI and T20. Also analysis of any any team in Test, ODI and T20 against other specific opposition, at home/away and neutral venues can be performed.

Have fun with cricketr!!

Cricketr learns new tricks : Performs fine-grained analysis of players

“He felt that his whole life was some kind of dream and he sometimes wondered whose it was and whether they were enjoying it.”

“The ships hung in the sky in much the same way that bricks don’t.”

“We demand rigidly defined areas of doubt and uncertainty!”

“For a moment, nothing happened. Then, after a second or so, nothing continued to happen.”

“The Answer to the Great Question… Of Life, the Universe and Everything… Is… Forty-two,’ said Deep Thought, with infinite majesty and calm.”

                 The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams

Introduction

In this post, I introduce 2 new functions in my R package ‘cricketr’ (cricketr v0.22) see Re-introducing cricketr! : An R package to analyze performances of cricketers which enable granular analysis of batsmen and bowlers. They are

  1. Step 1: getPlayerDataHA – This function is a wrapper around getPlayerData(), getPlayerDataOD() and getPlayerDataTT(), and adds an extra column ‘homeOrAway’ which says whether the match was played at home/away/neutral venues. A CSV file is created with this new column.
  2. Setp 2: getPlayerDataOppnHA – This function allows you to slice & dice the data for batsmen and bowlers against specific oppositions, at home/away/neutral venues and between certain periods. This reduced subset of data can be used to perform analyses. A CSV file is created as an output based on the parameters of opposition, home or away and the interval of time

Note All the existing cricketr functions can be used on this smaller fine-grained data set for a closer analysis of players

Note 1: You have to call the above functions only once. You can reuse the CSV files in other functions

Important note: Don’t go too fine-grained by choosing just one opposition, in one of home/away/neutral and for too short a period. Too small a dataset may defeat the purpose of the analysis!

This post has been published in Rpubs and can be accessed at Cricketr learns new tricks

You can download a PDF version of this post at Cricketr learns new tricks

If you are passionate about cricket, and love analyzing cricket performances, then check out my racy book on cricket ‘Cricket analytics with cricketr and cricpy – Analytics harmony with R & Python’! This book discusses and shows how to use my R package ‘cricketr’ and my Python package ‘cricpy’ to analyze batsmen and bowlers in all formats of the game (Test, ODI and T20). The paperback is available on Amazon at $21.99 and  the kindle version at $9.99/Rs 449/-. A must read for any cricket lover! Check it out!!

Untitled

1. Analyzing Tendulkar at 3 different stages of his career

The following functions analyze Sachin Tendulkar during 3 different periods of his illustrious career. a) 1st Jan 2001-1st Jan 2002 b) 1st Jan 2005-1st Jan 2006 c) 1st Jan 2012-1st Jan 2013

# Get the homeOrAway dataset for Tendulkar in matches
#Note: I have commented the lines to getPlayerDataHA() as I already have 
# CSV file
#df=getPlayerDataHA(35320,tfile="tendulkarTestHA.csv",matchType="Test")

# Get Tendulkar's data for 2001-02
df1=getPlayerDataOppnHA(infile="tendulkarHA.csv",outfile="tendulkarTest2001.csv",
                         startDate="2001-01-01",endDate="2002-01-01")

# Get Tendulkar's data for 2005-06
df2=getPlayerDataOppnHA(infile="tendulkarHA.csv",outfile="tendulkarTest2005.csv",

                                               startDate="2005-01-01",endDate="2006-01-01")

# Get Tendulkar's data for 20012-13
#df3=getPlayerDataOppnHA(infile="tendulkarHA.csv",outfile="tendulkarTest2012.csv",
#                        startDate="2012-01-01",endDate="2013-01-01")

`

1a Mean strike rate of Tendulkar in 2001,2005,2012

Note: Any of the cricketr R functions can be used on the fine-grained subset of data as below. The mean strike rate of Tendulkar is of the order of 60+ in 2001 which decreases to 50 and later to around 45

# Compute and plot mean strike rate of Tendulkar in the 3 periods
batsmanMeanStrikeRate ("./tendulkarTest2001.csv","Tendulkar-2001")

batsmanMeanStrikeRate ("./tendulkarTest2005.csv","Tendulkar-2005")

batsmanMeanStrikeRate ("./tendulkarTest2012.csv","Tendulkar-2012")

1b. Plot the performance of Tendulkar at venues during 2001,2005,2012

On an average Tendulkar score 60+ in 2001 and is really blazing. This performance decreases in 2005 and later in 2012

par(mfrow=c(1,3))
par(mar=c(4,4,2,2))
batsmanAvgRunsGround("tendulkarTest2001.csv","Tendulkar-2001")
batsmanAvgRunsGround("tendulkarTest2005.csv","Tendulkar-2005")
batsmanAvgRunsGround("tendulkarTest2012.csv","Tendulkar-2012")

dev.off()

 

 

1c. Plot the performance of Tendulkar against different oppositions during 2001,2005,2012

Sachin uniformly scores 50+ against formidable oppositions in 2001. In 2005 this decreases to 40 in 2005 and in 2012 it is around 25

batsmanAvgRunsOpposition("tendulkarTest2001.csv","Tendulkar-2001")
batsmanAvgRunsOpposition("tendulkarTest2005.csv","Tendulkar-2005")

batsmanAvgRunsOpposition("tendulkarTest2012.csv","Tendulkar-2012")

1d. Plot the relative cumulative average and relative strike rate of Tendulkar in 2001,2005,2012

The plot below compares Tendulkar’s cumulative strike rate and cumulative average during 3 different stages of his career

  1. The cumulative average runs of Tendulkar is in the high 60+ in 2001, which drops to ~50 in 2005 and later plummets to the low 25s in 2012
  2. The strike rate in 2001 for Tendulkar is amazing 60+
frames=list("tendulkarTest2001.csv","tendulkarTest2005.csv","tendulkarTest2012.csv")
names=list("Tendulkar-2001","Tendulkar-2005","Tendulkar-2012")
relativeBatsmanCumulativeAvgRuns(frames,names)

relativeBatsmanCumulativeStrikeRate(frames,names)

2. Analyzing Virat Kohli’s performance against England in England in 2014 and 2018

The analysis below looks at Kohli’s performance against England in ‘away’ venues (England) in 2014 and 2018

# Get the homeOrAway data for Kohli in Test matches
#df=getPlayerDataHA(253802,tfile="kohliTestHA.csv",type="batting",matchType="Test")

# Get the subset if data of Kohli's performance against England in England in 2014
df=getPlayerDataOppnHA(infile="kohliTestHA.csv",outfile="kohliTestEng2014.csv",
   opposition=c("England"),homeOrAway=c("away"),startDate="2014-01-01",endDate="2015-01-01")

# Get the subset if data of Kohli's performance against England in England in 2018
df1=getPlayerDataOppnHA(infile="kohliHA.csv",outfile="kohliTestEng2018.csv",
   opposition=c("England"),homeOrAway=c("away"),startDate="2018-01-01",endDate="2019-01-01")

2a. Kohli’s performance at England grounds in 2014 & 2018

Kohli had a miserable outing to England in 2014 with a string of low scores. In 2018 Kohli pulls himself out of the morass

batsmanAvgRunsGround("kohliTestEng2014.csv","Kohli-Eng-2014")

batsmanAvgRunsGround("kohliTestEng2018.csv","Kohli-Eng-2018")

2a. Kohli’s cumulative average runs in 2014 & 2018

Kohli’s cumulative average runs in 2014 is in the low 15s, while in 2018 it is 70+. Kohli stamps his class back again and undoes the bad memories of 2014

batsmanCumulativeAverageRuns("kohliTestEng2014.csv", "Kohli-Eng-2014")

batsmanCumulativeAverageRuns("kohliTestEng2018.csv", "Kohli-Eng-2018")

3a. Compare the performances of Ganguly, Dravid and VVS Laxman against opposition in ‘away’ matches in Tests

The analyses below compares the performances of Sourav Ganguly, Rahul Dravid and VVS Laxman against Australia, South Africa, and England in ‘away’ venues between 01 Jan 2002 to 01 Jan 2008

#Get the HA data for Ganguly, Dravid and Laxman
#df=getPlayerDataHA(28779,tfile="gangulyTestHA.csv",type="batting",matchType="Test")
#df=getPlayerDataHA(28114,tfile="dravidTestHA.csv",type="batting",matchType="Test")
#df=getPlayerDataHA(30750,tfile="laxmanTestHA.csv",type="batting",matchType="Test")


# Slice the data 
df=getPlayerDataOppnHA(infile="gangulyTestHA.csv",outfile="gangulyTestAES2002-08.csv"
                       ,opposition=c("Australia", "England", "South Africa"),
                       homeOrAway=c("away"),startDate="2002-01-01",endDate="2008-01-01")


df=getPlayerDataOppnHA(infile="dravidTestHA.csv",outfile="dravidTestAES2002-08.csv"
                       ,opposition=c("Australia", "England", "South Africa"),
                       homeOrAway=c("away"),startDate="2002-01-01",endDate="2008-01-01")


df=getPlayerDataOppnHA(infile="laxmanTestHA.csv",outfile="laxmanTestAES2002-08.csv"
                       ,opposition=c("Australia", "England", "South Africa"),
                       homeOrAway=c("away"),startDate="2002-01-01",endDate="2008-01-01")

3b Plot the relative cumulative average runs and relative cumative strike rate

Plot the relative cumulative average runs and relative cumative strike rate of Ganguly, Dravid and Laxman

-Dravid towers over Laxman and Ganguly with respect to cumulative average runs. – Ganguly has a superior strike rate followed by Laxman and then Dravid

frames=list("gangulyTestAES2002-08.csv","dravidTestAES2002-08.csv","laxmanTestAES2002-08.csv")
names=list("GangulyAusEngSA2002-08","DravidAusEngSA2002-08","LaxmanAusEngSA2002-08")
relativeBatsmanCumulativeAvgRuns(frames,names)

relativeBatsmanCumulativeStrikeRate(frames,names)

4. Compare the ODI performances of Rohit Sharma, Joe Root and Kane Williamson against opposition

Compare the performances of Rohit Sharma, Joe Root and Kane williamson in away & neutral venues against Australia, West Indies and Soouth Africa

  • Joe Root piles us the runs in about 15 matches. Rohit has played far more ODIs than the other two and averages a steady 35+
# Get the ODI HA data for Rohit, Root and Williamson
#df=getPlayerDataHA(34102,tfile="rohitODIHA.csv",type="batting",matchType="ODI")
#df=getPlayerDataHA(303669,tfile="joerootODIHA.csv",type="batting",matchType="ODI")
#df=getPlayerDataHA(277906,tfile="williamsonODIHA.csv",type="batting",matchType="ODI")

# Subset the data for specific opposition in away and neutral venues
df=getPlayerDataOppnHA(infile="rohitODIHA.csv",outfile="rohitODIAusWISA.csv"
                       ,opposition=c("Australia", "West Indies", "South Africa"),
                      homeOrAway=c("away","neutral"))

df=getPlayerDataOppnHA(infile="joerootODIHA.csv",outfile="joerootODIAusWISA.csv"
                       ,opposition=c("Australia", "West Indies", "South Africa"),
                       homeOrAway=c("away","neutral"))

df=getPlayerDataOppnHA(infile="williamsonODIHA.csv",outfile="williamsonODIAusWiSA.csv"
                       ,opposition=c("Australia", "West Indies", "South Africa"),
                       homeOrAway=c("away","neutral"))

4a. Compare cumulative strike rates and cumulative average runs of Rohit, Root and Williamson

The relative cumulative strike rate of all 3 are comparable

frames=list("rohitODIAusWISA.csv","joerootODIAusWISA.csv","williamsonODIAusWiSA.csv")
names=list("Rohit-ODI-AusWISA","Joe Root-ODI-AusWISA","Williamson-ODI-AusWISA")
relativeBatsmanCumulativeAvgRuns(frames,names)

relativeBatsmanCumulativeStrikeRate(frames,names)

5. Plot the performance of Dhoni in T20s against specific opposition at all venues

Plot the performances of Dhoni against Australia, West Indies, South Africa and England

# Get the HA T20 data for Dhoni
#df=getPlayerDataHA(28081,tfile="dhoniT20HA.csv",type="batting",matchType="T20")

#Subset the data
df=getPlayerDataOppnHA(infile="dhoniT20HA.csv",outfile="dhoniT20AusWISAEng.csv"
                       ,opposition=c("Australia", "West Indies", "South Africa","England"),
                       homeOrAway=c("all"))

5a. Plot Dhoni’s performances in T20

Note You can use any of cricketr’s functions against the fine grained data

batsmanAvgRunsOpposition("dhoniT20AusWISAEng.csv","Dhoni")

batsmanAvgRunsGround("dhoniT20AusWISAEng.csv","Dhoni")

batsmanCumulativeStrikeRate("dhoniT20AusWISAEng.csv","Dhoni")

batsmanCumulativeAverageRuns("dhoniT20AusWISAEng.csv","Dhoni")

6. Compute and performances of Anil Kumble, Muralitharan and Warne in ‘away’ test matches

Compute the performances of Kumble, Warne and Maralitharan against New Zealand, West Indies, South Africa and England in pitches that are not ‘home’ pithes

# Get the bowling data for Kumble, Warne and Muralitharan in Test matches
#df=getPlayerDataHA(30176,tfile="kumbleTestHA.csv",type="bowling",matchType="Test")
#df=getPlayerDataHA(8166,tfile="warneTestHA.csv",type="bowling",matchType="Test")
#df=getPlayerDataHA(49636,tfile="muraliTestHA.csv",type="bowling",matchType="Test")


# Subset the data
df=getPlayerDataOppnHA(infile="kumbleTestHA.csv",outfile="kumbleTest-NZWISAEng.csv"
                       ,opposition=c("New Zealand", "West Indies", "South Africa","England"),
                       homeOrAway=c("away"))

df=getPlayerDataOppnHA(infile="warneTestHA.csv",outfile="warneTest-NZWISAEng.csv"
                       ,opposition=c("New Zealand", "West Indies", "South Africa","England"),
                       homeOrAway=c("away"))

df=getPlayerDataOppnHA(infile="muraliTestHA.csv",outfile="muraliTest-NZWISAEng.csv"
                       ,opposition=c("New Zealand", "West Indies", "South Africa","England"),
                       homeOrAway=c("away"))

6a. Plot the average wickets of Kumble, Warne and Murali

bowlerAvgWktsOpposition("kumbleTest-NZWISAEng.csv","Kumble-NZWISAEng-AN")

bowlerAvgWktsOpposition("warneTest-NZWISAEng.csv","Warne-NZWISAEng-AN")

bowlerAvgWktsOpposition("muraliTest-NZWISAEng.csv","Murali-NZWISAEng-AN")

6b. Plot the average wickets in different grounds of Kumble, Warne and Murali

bowlerAvgWktsGround("kumbleTest-NZWISAEng.csv","Kumblew")

bowlerAvgWktsGround("warneTest-NZWISAEng.csv","Warne")

bowlerAvgWktsGround("muraliTest-NZWISAEng.csv","murali")

6c. Plot the cumulative average wickets and cumulative economy rate of Kumble, Warne and Murali

  • Murali has the best economy rate followed by Kumble and then Warne
  • Again Murali has the best cumulative average wickets followed by Warne and then Kumble
frames=list("kumbleTest-NZWISAEng.csv","warneTest-NZWISAEng.csv","muraliTest-NZWISAEng.csv")
names=list("Kumble","Warne","Murali")
relativeBowlerCumulativeAvgEconRate(frames,names)

relativeBowlerCumulativeAvgWickets(frames,names)

7. Compute and plot the performances of Bumrah in 2016, 2017 and 2018 in ODIs

# Get the HA data for Bumrah in ODI in bowling
df=getPlayerDataHA(625383,tfile="bumrahODIHA.csv",type="bowling",matchType="ODI")
## [1] "Working..."
# Slice the data for periods 2016, 2017 and 2018
df=getPlayerDataOppnHA(infile="bumrahODIHA.csv",outfile="bumrahODI2016.csv",
                       startDate="2016-01-01",endDate="2017-01-01")

df=getPlayerDataOppnHA(infile="bumrahODIHA.csv",outfile="bumrahODI2017.csv",
                       startDate="2017-01-01",endDate="2018-01-01")

df=getPlayerDataOppnHA(infile="bumrahODIHA.csv",outfile="bumrahODI2018.csv",
                       startDate="2018-01-01",endDate="2019-01-01")

7a. Compute the performances of Bumrah in 2016, 2017 and 2018

  • Very clearly Bumrah is getting better at his art. His economy rate in 2018 is the best!!!
  • Bumrah has had a very prolific year in 2017. However all the years he seems to be quite effective
frames=list("bumrahODI2016.csv","bumrahODI2017.csv","bumrahODI2018.csv")
names=list("Bumrah-2016","Bumrah-2017","Bumrah-2018")
relativeBowlerCumulativeAvgEconRate(frames,names)

relativeBowlerCumulativeAvgWickets(frames,names)

8. Compute and plot the performances of Shakib, Bumrah and Jadeja in T20 matches for bowling

# Get the HA bowling data for Shakib, Bumrah and Jadeja
df=getPlayerDataHA(56143,tfile="shakibT20HA.csv",type="bowling",matchType="T20")
## [1] "Working..."
df=getPlayerDataHA(625383,tfile="bumrahT20HA.csv",type="bowling",matchType="T20")
## [1] "Working..."
df=getPlayerDataHA(234675,tfile="jadejaT20HA.csv",type="bowling",matchType="T20")
## [1] "Working..."
# Slice the data for performances against Sri Lanka, Australia, South Africa and England
df=getPlayerDataOppnHA(infile="shakibT20HA.csv",outfile="shakibT20-SLAusSAEng.csv"
                       ,opposition=c("Sri Lanka","Australia", "South Africa","England"),
                       homeOrAway=c("all"))
df=getPlayerDataOppnHA(infile="bumrahT20HA.csv",outfile="bumrahT20-SLAusSAEng.csv"
                       ,opposition=c("Sri Lanka","Australia", "South Africa","England"),
                       homeOrAway=c("all"))

df=getPlayerDataOppnHA(infile="jadejaT20HA.csv",outfile="jadejaT20-SLAusSAEng.csv"
                       ,opposition=c("Sri Lanka","Australia", "South Africa","England"),
                       homeOrAway=c("all"))

8a. Compare the relative performances of Shakib, Bumrah and Jadeja

  • Jadeja and Bumrah have comparable economy rates. Shakib is more expensive
  • Shakib pips Bumrah in number of cumulative wickets, though Bumrah is close behind
frames=list("shakibT20-SLAusSAEng.csv","bumrahT20-SLAusSAEng.csv","jadejaT20-SLAusSAEng.csv")
names=list("Shakib-SLAusSAEng","Bumrah-SLAusSAEng","Jadeja-SLAusSAEng")
relativeBowlerCumulativeAvgEconRate(frames,names)

relativeBowlerCumulativeAvgWickets(frames,names)

Conclusion

By getting the homeOrAway data for players using the profileNo, you can slice and dice the data based on your choice of opposition, whether you want matches that were played at home/away/neutral venues. Finally by specifying the period for which the data has to be subsetted you can create fine grained analysis.

Hope you have a great time with cricketr!!!

Also see

1. My book ‘Deep Learning from first principles:Second Edition’ now on Amazon
2. Cricpy takes a swing at the ODIs
3. My book ‘Practical Machine Learning in R and Python: Third edition’ on Amazon
4. Googly: An interactive app for analyzing IPL players, matches and teams using R package yorkr
5. Big Data-2: Move into the big league:Graduate from R to SparkR
6. Rock N’ Roll with Bluemix, Cloudant & NodeExpress
7. A method to crowd source pothole marking on (Indian) roads
8. De-blurring revisited with Wiener filter using OpenCV

To see all posts click Index of posts

Analyzing cricketers’ and cricket team’s performances with cricketr template

This post includes a template which you can use for analyzing the performances of cricketers, both batsmen and bowlers in Test, ODI and Twenty 20 cricket. Additionally this template can also be used for analyzing performances of teams in Test, ODI and T20 matches using my R package cricketr. To see actual usage of functions related to players in the R package cricketr see Introducing cricketr! : An R package to analyze performances of cricketers and associated posts on cricket in Index of posts. For the analyses on team performances see https://gigadom.in/2019/06/21/cricpy-adds-team-analytics-to-its-repertoire/

The ‘cricketr’ package uses the statistics info available in ESPN Cricinfo Statsguru. The current version of this package supports all formats of the game including Test, ODI and Twenty20 versions.

You should be able to install the package from GitHub and use the many functions available in the package. Please mindful of the ESPN Cricinfo Terms of Use

Take a look at my short video tutorial on my R package cricketr on Youtube – R package cricketr – A short tutorial

Do check out my interactive Shiny app implementation using the cricketr package – Sixer – R package cricketr’s new Shiny avatar

You can download this RMarkdown file from Github at cricketr-template

The cricketr package

The cricketr package has several functions that perform several different analyses on both batsman and bowlers. The package can also analyze performances of teams The package has function that plot percentage frequency runs or wickets, runs likelihood for a batsman, relative run/strike rates of batsman and relative performance/economy rate for bowlers are available. Other interesting functions include batting performance moving average, forecast and a function to check whether the batsmans in in-form or out-of-form.

In addition performances of teams against different oppositions at different venues can be computed and plotted. The timeline of wins & losses can be plotted.

A. Performances of batsmen and bowlers

The data for a particular player can be obtained with the getPlayerData() function. To do you will need to go to ESPN CricInfo Player and type in the name of the player for e.g Ricky Ponting, Sachin Tendulkar etc. This will bring up a page which have the profile number for the player e.g. for Sachin Tendulkar this would be http://www.espncricinfo.com/india/content/player/35320.html. Hence, Sachin’s profile is 35320. This can be used to get the data for Tendulkar as shown below

The cricketr package is now available from CRAN!!! You should be able to install as below

1. Install the cricketr package

if (!require("cricketr")){
    install.packages("cricketr",lib = "c:/test")
}
library(cricketr)

The cricketr package includes some pre-packaged sample (.csv) files. You can use these sample to test functions as shown below
# Retrieve the file path of a data file installed with cricketr
#pathToFile <- system.file("data", "tendulkar.csv", package = "cricketr")
#batsman4s(pathToFile, "Sachin Tendulkar")

# The general format is pkg-function(pathToFile,par1,...)
#batsman4s(<path-To-File>,"Sachin Tendulkar")

The pre-packaged files can be accessed as shown above. To get the data of any player use the function in Test, ODI and Twenty20 use the following

2. For Test cricket

#tendulkar <- getPlayerData(35320,dir="..",file="tendulkar.csv",type="batting",homeOrAway=c(1,2), result=c(1,2,4))

2a. For ODI cricket

#tendulkarOD <- getPlayerDataOD(35320,dir="..",file="tendulkarOD.csv",type="batting")

2b For Twenty 20 cricket

#tendulkarT20 <- getPlayerDataTT(35320,dir="..",file="tendulkarT20.csv",type="batting")

Important Note 1: This needs to be done only once for a player. This function stores the player’s data in a CSV file (for e.g. tendulkar.csv as above) which can then be reused for all other functions. Once we have the data for the players many analyses can be done. This post will use the stored CSV file obtained with a prior getPlayerData for all subsequent analyses

Important Note 2: The same set of functions can be used for Tests, ODI and T20s. I have mentioned wherever you may need special functions for ODI and T20 below

Sachin Tendulkar’s performance – Basic Analyses

The 3 plots below provide the following for Tendulkar

  1. Frequency percentage of runs in each run range over the whole career
  2. Mean Strike Rate for runs scored in the given range
  3. A histogram of runs frequency percentages in runs ranges For example

3. Basic analyses

par(mfrow=c(1,3))
par(mar=c(4,4,2,2))
#batsmanRunsFreqPerf("./tendulkar.csv","Tendulkar")
#batsmanMeanStrikeRate("./tendulkar.csv","Tendulkar")
#batsmanRunsRanges("./tendulkar.csv","Tendulkar")
dev.off()
## null device 
##           1
  1. Player 1
  2. Player 2
  3. Player 3
  4. Player 4

4. More analyses

par(mfrow=c(1,3))
par(mar=c(4,4,2,2))
#batsman4s("./player1.csv","Player1")
#batsman6s("./player1.csv","Player1")
#batsmanMeanStrikeRate("./player1.csv","Player1")

# For ODI and T20
#batsmanScoringRateODTT("./player1.csv","Player1")
dev.off()
## null device 
##           1
par(mfrow=c(1,3))
par(mar=c(4,4,2,2))
#batsman4s("./player2.csv","Player2")
#batsman6s("./player2.csv","Player2")
#batsmanMeanStrikeRate("./player2.csv","Player2")
# For ODI and T20
#batsmanScoringRateODTT("./player1.csv","Player1")
dev.off()
## null device 
##           1
par(mfrow=c(1,3))
par(mar=c(4,4,2,2))
#batsman4s("./player3.csv","Player3")
#batsman6s("./player3.csv","Player3")
#batsmanMeanStrikeRate("./player3.csv","Player3")
# For ODI and T20
#batsmanScoringRateODTT("./player1.csv","Player1")

dev.off()
## null device 
##           1
par(mfrow=c(1,3))
par(mar=c(4,4,2,2))
#batsman4s("./player4.csv","Player4")
#batsman6s("./player4.csv","Player4")
#batsmanMeanStrikeRate("./player4.csv","Player4")
# For ODI and T20
#batsmanScoringRateODTT("./player1.csv","Player1")
dev.off()
## null device 
##           1

Note: For mean strike rate in ODI and Twenty20 use the function batsmanScoringRateODTT()

5.Boxplot histogram plot

This plot shows a combined boxplot of the Runs ranges and a histogram of the Runs Frequency

#batsmanPerfBoxHist("./player1.csv","Player1")
#batsmanPerfBoxHist("./player2.csv","Player2")
#batsmanPerfBoxHist("./player3.csv","Player3")
#batsmanPerfBoxHist("./player4.csv","Player4")

6. Contribution to won and lost matches

For the 2 functions below you will have to use the getPlayerDataSp() function. I have commented this as I already have these files. This function can only be used for Test matches

#player1sp <- getPlayerDataSp(xxxx,tdir=".",tfile="player1sp.csv",ttype="batting")
#player2sp <- getPlayerDataSp(xxxx,tdir=".",tfile="player2sp.csv",ttype="batting")
#player3sp <- getPlayerDataSp(xxxx,tdir=".",tfile="player3sp.csv",ttype="batting")
#player4sp <- getPlayerDataSp(xxxx,tdir=".",tfile="player4sp.csv",ttype="batting")
par(mfrow=c(2,2))
par(mar=c(4,4,2,2))
#batsmanContributionWonLost("player1sp.csv","Player1")
#batsmanContributionWonLost("player2sp.csv","Player2")
#batsmanContributionWonLost("player3sp.csv","Player3")
#batsmanContributionWonLost("player4sp.csv","Player4")
dev.off()
## null device 
##           1

7, Performance at home and overseas

This function also requires the use of getPlayerDataSp() as shown above. This can only be used for Test matches

par(mfrow=c(2,2))
par(mar=c(4,4,2,2))
#batsmanPerfHomeAway("player1sp.csv","Player1")
#batsmanPerfHomeAway("player2sp.csv","Player2")
#batsmanPerfHomeAway("player3sp.csv","Player3")
#batsmanPerfHomeAway("player4sp.csv","Player4")
dev.off()
## null device 
##           1

8. Batsman average at different venues

par(mfrow=c(2,2))
par(mar=c(4,4,2,2))
#batsmanAvgRunsGround("./player1.csv","Player1")
#batsmanAvgRunsGround("./player2.csv","Player2")
#batsmanAvgRunsGround("./player3.csv","Ponting")
#batsmanAvgRunsGround("./player4.csv","Player4")
dev.off()
## null device 
##           1

9. Batsman average against different opposition

par(mfrow=c(2,2))
par(mar=c(4,4,2,2))
#batsmanAvgRunsOpposition("./player1.csv","Player1")
#batsmanAvgRunsOpposition("./player2.csv","Player2")
#batsmanAvgRunsOpposition("./player3.csv","Ponting")
#batsmanAvgRunsOpposition("./player4.csv","Player4")
dev.off()
## null device 
##           1

10. Runs Likelihood of batsman

par(mfrow=c(2,2))
par(mar=c(4,4,2,2))
#batsmanRunsLikelihood("./player1.csv","Player1")
#batsmanRunsLikelihood("./player2.csv","Player2")
#batsmanRunsLikelihood("./player3.csv","Ponting")
#batsmanRunsLikelihood("./player4.csv","Player4")
dev.off()
## null device 
##           1

11. Moving Average of runs in career

par(mfrow=c(2,2))
par(mar=c(4,4,2,2))
#batsmanMovingAverage("./player1.csv","Player1")
#batsmanMovingAverage("./player2.csv","Player2")
#batsmanMovingAverage("./player3.csv","Ponting")
#batsmanMovingAverage("./player4.csv","Player4")
dev.off()
## null device 
##           1

12. Cumulative Average runs of batsman in career

par(mfrow=c(2,2))
par(mar=c(4,4,2,2))
#batsmanCumulativeAverageRuns("./player1.csv","Player1")
#batsmanCumulativeAverageRuns("./player2.csv","Player2")
#batsmanCumulativeAverageRuns("./player3.csv","Ponting")
#batsmanCumulativeAverageRuns("./player4.csv","Player4")
dev.off()
## null device 
##           1

13. Cumulative Average strike rate of batsman in career

par(mfrow=c(2,2))
par(mar=c(4,4,2,2))
#batsmanCumulativeStrikeRate("./player1.csv","Player1")
#batsmanCumulativeStrikeRate("./player2.csv","Player2")
#batsmanCumulativeStrikeRate("./player3.csv","Ponting")
#batsmanCumulativeStrikeRate("./player4.csv","Player4")
dev.off()
## null device 
##           1

14. Future Runs forecast

Here are plots that forecast how the batsman will perform in future. In this case 90% of the career runs trend is uses as the training set. the remaining 10% is the test set.

A Holt-Winters forecating model is used to forecast future performance based on the 90% training set. The forecated runs trend is plotted. The test set is also plotted to see how close the forecast and the actual matches

Take a look at the runs forecasted for the batsman below.

par(mfrow=c(2,2))
par(mar=c(4,4,2,2))
#batsmanPerfForecast("./player1.csv","Player1")
#batsmanPerfForecast("./player2.csv","Player2")
#batsmanPerfForecast("./player3.csv","Player3")
#batsmanPerfForecast("./player4.csv","Player4")
dev.off()
## null device 
##           1

15. Relative Mean Strike Rate plot

The plot below compares the Mean Strike Rate of the batsman for each of the runs ranges of 10 and plots them. The plot indicate the following

frames <- list("./player1.csv","./player2.csv","player3.csv","player4.csv")
names <- list("Player1","Player2","Player3","Player4")
#relativeBatsmanSR(frames,names)

16. Relative Runs Frequency plot

The plot below gives the relative Runs Frequency Percetages for each 10 run bucket. The plot below show

frames <- list("./player1.csv","./player2.csv","player3.csv","player4.csv")
names <- list("Player1","Player2","Player3","Player4")
#relativeRunsFreqPerf(frames,names)

17. Relative cumulative average runs in career

frames <- list("./player1.csv","./player2.csv","player3.csv","player4.csv")
names <- list("Player1","Player2","Player3","Player4")
#relativeBatsmanCumulativeAvgRuns(frames,names)

18. Relative cumulative average strike rate in career

frames <- list("./player1.csv","./player2.csv","player3.csv","player4.csv")
names <- list("Player1","Player2","Player3","player4")
#relativeBatsmanCumulativeStrikeRate(frames,names)

19. Check Batsman In-Form or Out-of-Form

The below computation uses Null Hypothesis testing and p-value to determine if the batsman is in-form or out-of-form. For this 90% of the career runs is chosen as the population and the mean computed. The last 10% is chosen to be the sample set and the sample Mean and the sample Standard Deviation are caculated.

The Null Hypothesis (H0) assumes that the batsman continues to stay in-form where the sample mean is within 95% confidence interval of population mean The Alternative (Ha) assumes that the batsman is out of form the sample mean is beyond the 95% confidence interval of the population mean.

A significance value of 0.05 is chosen and p-value us computed If p-value >= .05 – Batsman In-Form If p-value < 0.05 – Batsman Out-of-Form

Note Ideally the p-value should be done for a population that follows the Normal Distribution. But the runs population is usually left skewed. So some correction may be needed. I will revisit this later

This is done for the Top 4 batsman

#checkBatsmanInForm("./player1.csv","Player1")
#checkBatsmanInForm("./player2.csv","Player2")
#checkBatsmanInForm("./player3.csv","Player3")
#checkBatsmanInForm("./player4.csv","Player4")

20. 3D plot of Runs vs Balls Faced and Minutes at Crease

The plot is a scatter plot of Runs vs Balls faced and Minutes at Crease. A prediction plane is fitted

par(mfrow=c(1,2))
par(mar=c(4,4,2,2))
#battingPerf3d("./player1.csv","Player1")
#battingPerf3d("./player2.csv","Player2")
par(mfrow=c(1,2))
par(mar=c(4,4,2,2))
#battingPerf3d("./player3.csv","Player3")
#battingPerf3d("./player4.csv","player4")
dev.off()
## null device 
##           1

21. Predicting Runs given Balls Faced and Minutes at Crease

A multi-variate regression plane is fitted between Runs and Balls faced +Minutes at crease.

BF <- seq( 10, 400,length=15)
Mins <- seq(30,600,length=15)
newDF <- data.frame(BF,Mins)
#Player1 <- batsmanRunsPredict("./player1.csv","Player1",newdataframe=newDF)
#Player2 <- batsmanRunsPredict("./player2.csv","Player2",newdataframe=newDF)
#ponting <- batsmanRunsPredict("./player3.csv","Player3",newdataframe=newDF)
#sangakkara <- batsmanRunsPredict("./player4.csv","Player4",newdataframe=newDF)
#batsmen <-cbind(round(Player1$Runs),round(Player2$Runs),round(Player3$Runs),round(Player4$Runs))
#colnames(batsmen) <- c("Player1","Player2","Player3","Player4")
#newDF <- data.frame(round(newDF$BF),round(newDF$Mins))
#colnames(newDF) <- c("BallsFaced","MinsAtCrease")
#predictedRuns <- cbind(newDF,batsmen)
#predictedRuns

Analysis of bowlers

  1. Bowler1
  2. Bowler2
  3. Bowler3
  4. Bowler4

player1 <- getPlayerData(xxxx,dir=“..”,file=“player1.csv”,type=“bowling”) Note For One day you will have to use getPlayerDataOD() and for Twenty20 it is getPlayerDataTT()

21. Wicket Frequency Plot

This plot below computes the percentage frequency of number of wickets taken for e.g 1 wicket x%, 2 wickets y% etc and plots them as a continuous line

par(mfrow=c(1,3))
par(mar=c(4,4,2,2))
#bowlerWktsFreqPercent("./bowler1.csv","Bowler1")
#bowlerWktsFreqPercent("./bowler2.csv","Bowler2")
#bowlerWktsFreqPercent("./bowler3.csv","Bowler3")
dev.off()
## null device 
##           1

22. Wickets Runs plot

par(mfrow=c(1,3))
par(mar=c(4,4,2,2))
#bowlerWktsRunsPlot("./bowler1.csv","Bowler1")
#bowlerWktsRunsPlot("./bowler2.csv","Bowler2")
#bowlerWktsRunsPlot("./bowler3.csv","Bowler3")
dev.off()
## null device 
##           1

23. Average wickets at different venues

#bowlerAvgWktsGround("./bowler3.csv","Bowler3")

24. Average wickets against different opposition

#bowlerAvgWktsOpposition("./bowler3.csv","Bowler3")

25. Wickets taken moving average

par(mfrow=c(1,3))
par(mar=c(4,4,2,2))
#bowlerMovingAverage("./bowler1.csv","Bowler1")
#bowlerMovingAverage("./bowler2.csv","Bowler2")
#bowlerMovingAverage("./bowler3.csv","Bowler3")

dev.off()
## null device 
##           1

26. Cumulative Wickets taken

par(mfrow=c(1,3))
par(mar=c(4,4,2,2))
#bowlerCumulativeAvgWickets("./bowler1.csv","Bowler1")
#bowlerCumulativeAvgWickets("./bowler2.csv","Bowler2")
#bowlerCumulativeAvgWickets("./bowler3.csv","Bowler3")
dev.off()
## null device 
##           1

27. Cumulative Economy rate

par(mfrow=c(1,3))
par(mar=c(4,4,2,2))
#bowlerCumulativeAvgEconRate("./bowler1.csv","Bowler1")
#bowlerCumulativeAvgEconRate("./bowler2.csv","Bowler2")
#bowlerCumulativeAvgEconRate("./bowler3.csv","Bowler3")
dev.off()
## null device 
##           1

28. Future Wickets forecast

Here are plots that forecast how the bowler will perform in future. In this case 90% of the career wickets trend is used as the training set. the remaining 10% is the test set.

A Holt-Winters forecating model is used to forecast future performance based on the 90% training set. The forecated wickets trend is plotted. The test set is also plotted to see how close the forecast and the actual matches

par(mfrow=c(1,3))
par(mar=c(4,4,2,2))
#bowlerPerfForecast("./bowler1.csv","Bowler1")
#bowlerPerfForecast("./bowler2.csv","Bowler2")
#bowlerPerfForecast("./bowler3.csv","Bowler3")
dev.off()
## null device 
##           1

29. Contribution to matches won and lost

As discussed above the next 2 charts require the use of getPlayerDataSp(). This can only be done for Test matches

#bowler1sp <- getPlayerDataSp(xxxx,tdir=".",tfile="bowler1sp.csv",ttype="bowling")
#bowler2sp <- getPlayerDataSp(xxxx,tdir=".",tfile="bowler2sp.csv",ttype="bowling")
#bowler3sp <- getPlayerDataSp(xxxx,tdir=".",tfile="bowler3sp.csv",ttype="bowling")
par(mfrow=c(1,3))
par(mar=c(4,4,2,2))
#bowlerContributionWonLost("bowler1sp","Bowler1")
#bowlerContributionWonLost("bowler2sp","Bowler2")
#bowlerContributionWonLost("bowler3sp","Bowler3")
dev.off()
## null device 
##           1

30. Performance home and overseas.

This can only be done for Test matches

par(mfrow=c(1,3))
par(mar=c(4,4,2,2))
#bowlerPerfHomeAway("bowler1sp","Bowler1")
#bowlerPerfHomeAway("bowler2sp","Bowler2")
#bowlerPerfHomeAway("bowler3sp","Bowler3")
dev.off()
## null device 
##           1

31 Relative Wickets Frequency Percentage

frames <- list("./bowler1.csv","./bowler3.csv","bowler2.csv")
names <- list("Bowler1","Bowler3","Bowler2")
#relativeBowlingPerf(frames,names)

32 Relative Economy Rate against wickets taken

frames <- list("./bowler1.csv","./bowler3.csv","bowler2.csv")
names <- list("Bowler1","Bowler3","Bowler2")
#relativeBowlingER(frames,names)

33 Relative cumulative average wickets of bowlers in career

frames <- list("./bowler1.csv","./bowler3.csv","bowler2.csv")
names <- list("Bowler1","Bowler3","Bowler2")
#relativeBowlerCumulativeAvgWickets(frames,names)

34 Relative cumulative average economy rate of bowlers

frames <- list("./bowler1.csv","./bowler3.csv","bowler2.csv")
names <- list("Bowler1","Bowler3","Bowler2")
#relativeBowlerCumulativeAvgEconRate(frames,names)

35 Check for bowler in-form/out-of-form

The below computation uses Null Hypothesis testing and p-value to determine if the bowler is in-form or out-of-form. For this 90% of the career wickets is chosen as the population and the mean computed. The last 10% is chosen to be the sample set and the sample Mean and the sample Standard Deviation are caculated.

The Null Hypothesis (H0) assumes that the bowler continues to stay in-form where the sample mean is within 95% confidence interval of population mean The Alternative (Ha) assumes that the bowler is out of form the sample mean is beyond the 95% confidence interval of the population mean.

A significance value of 0.05 is chosen and p-value us computed If p-value >= .05 – Batsman In-Form If p-value < 0.05 – Batsman Out-of-Form

Note Ideally the p-value should be done for a population that follows the Normal Distribution. But the runs population is usually left skewed. So some correction may be needed. I will revisit this later

Note: The check for the form status of the bowlers indicate

#checkBowlerInForm("./bowler1.csv","Bowler1")
#checkBowlerInForm("./bowler2.csv","Bowler2")
#checkBowlerInForm("./bowler3.csv","Bowler3")
dev.off()
## null device 
##           1

36. Performing granular analysis of batsmen and bowlers

To perform granular analysis of batsmen and bowlers do the following 2 steps

  1. Step 1: getPlayerDataHA – This function is a wrapper around getPlayerData(), getPlayerDataOD() and getPlayerDataTT(), and adds an extra column ‘homeOrAway’ which says whether the match was played at home/away/neutral venues. A CSV file is created with this new column.
  2. Step2:getPlayerDataOppnHA – This function allows you to slice & dice the data for batsmen and bowlers against specific oppositions, at home/away/neutral venues and between certain periods. This reduced subset of data can be used to perform analyses. A CSV file is created as an output based on the parameters of opposition, home or away and the interval of time

37. GetPlayerDataHA (Batsmen, Tests)

#This saves a file playerTestHA.csv
#df=getPlayerDataHA(<profileNo>,tfile="playerTestHA.csv",type="batting", matchType="Test")

#Use the generate file to create a subset of data
#df1=getPlayerDataOppnHA(infile="playerTestHA.csv",outfile="playerTestFile1.csv",
#                         startDate=<start Date>,endDate=<end Date>)

38. GetPlayerDataHA (Bowlers, Tests)

#This saves a file playerTestHA.csv
#df=getPlayerDataHA(<profileNo>,tfile="playerTestHA.csv",type="bowling", matchType="Test")

#Use the generate file to create a subset of data
#df1=getPlayerDataOppnHA(infile="playerTestHA.csv",outfile="playerTestFile1.csv",
#                         startDate=<start Date>,endDate=<end Date>)

39. GetPlayerDataHA (Batsmen, ODI)

#This saves a file playerTestHA.csv
#df=getPlayerDataHA(<profileNo>,tfile="playerODIHA.csv",type="batting", matchType="ODI")

#Use the generate file to create a subset of data
#df1=getPlayerDataOppnHA(infile="playerODIHA.csv",outfile="playerODIFile1.csv",
#                         startDate=<start Date>,endDate=<end Date>)

40. GetPlayerDataHA (Bowlers, ODI)

#This saves a file playerTestHA.csv
#df=getPlayerDataHA(<profileNo>,tfile="playerODIHA.csv",type="bowling", matchType="ODI")

#Use the generate file to create a subset of data
#df1=getPlayerDataOppnHA(infile="playerODIHA.csv",outfile="playerODIFile1.csv",
#                         startDate=<start Date>,endDate=<end Date>)

41. GetPlayerDataHA (Batsmen, T20)

#This saves a file playerTestHA.csv
#df=getPlayerDataHA(<profileNo>,tfile="playerT20HA.csv",type="batting", matchType="T20")

#Use the generate file to create a subset of data
#df1=getPlayerDataOppnHA(infile="playerT20HA.csv",outfile="playerT20File1.csv",
#                         startDate=<start Date>,endDate=<end Date>)

42. GetPlayerDataHA (Bowlers, T20)

#This saves a file playerTestHA.csv
#df=getPlayerDataHA(<profileNo>,tfile="playerT20HA.csv",type="bowling", matchType="T20")

#Use the generate file to create a subset of data
#df1=getPlayerDataOppnHA(infile="playerT20HA.csv",outfile="playerT20File1.csv",
#                         startDate=<start Date>,endDate=<end Date>)

Important Note Once you get the subset of data for batsmen and bowlers playerTestFile1.csv, playerODIFile1.csv or playerT20File1.csv , you can use any of the cricketr functions on the subset of data for a fine-grained analysis

B. Performances of teams

The following functions will get the team data for Tests, ODI and T20s

1a. Get Test team data

#country1Test= getTeamDataHomeAway(dir=".",teamView="bat",matchType="Test",file="country1Test.csv",save=True,teamName="Country1")
#country2Test= getTeamDataHomeAway(dir=".",teamView="bat",matchType="Test",file="country2Test.csv",save=True,teamName="Country2")
#country3Test= getTeamDataHomeAway(dir=".",teamView="bat",matchType="Test",file="country3Test.csv",save=True,teamName="Country3")

1b. Get ODI team data

#team1ODI=  getTeamDataHomeAway(dir=".",matchType="ODI",file="team1ODI.csv",save=True,teamName="team1")
#team2ODI=  getTeamDataHomeAway(dir=".",matchType="ODI",file="team2ODI.csv",save=True,teamName="team2")
#team3ODI=  getTeamDataHomeAway(dir=".",matchType="ODI",file="team3ODI.csv",save=True,teamName="team3")

1c. Get T20 team data

#team1T20 = getTeamDataHomeAway(matchType="T20",file="team1T20.csv",save=True,teamName="team1")
#team2T20 = getTeamDataHomeAway(matchType="T20",file="team2T20.csv",save=True,teamName="team2")
#team3T20 = getTeamDataHomeAway(matchType="T20",file="team3T20.csv",save=True,teamName="team3")

2a. Test – Analyzing test performances against opposition

# Get the performance of Indian test team against all teams at all venues as a dataframe
#df <- teamWinLossStatusVsOpposition("country1Test.csv",teamName="Country1",opposition=c("all"),homeOrAway=c("all"),matchType="Test",plot=FALSE)
#head(df)

# Plot the performance of Country1 Test team  against all teams at all venues
#teamWinLossStatusVsOpposition("country1Test.csv",teamName="Country1",opposition=c("all"),homeOrAway=c("all"),matchType="Test",plot=TRUE)

# Plot the performance of Country1 Test team  against specific teams at home/away venues
#teamWinLossStatusVsOpposition("country1Test.csv",teamName="Country1",opposition=c("Country2","Country3","Country4"),homeOrAway=c("home","away","neutral"),matchType="Test",plot=TRUE)

2b. Test – Analyzing test performances against opposition at different grounds

# Get the performance of Indian test team against all teams at all venues as a dataframe
#df <- teamWinLossStatusAtGrounds("country1Test.csv",teamName="Country1",opposition=c("all"),homeOrAway=c("all"),matchType="Test",plot=FALSE)
#head(df)

# Plot the performance of Country1 Test team  against all teams at all venues
#teamWinLossStatusAtGrounds("country1Test.csv",teamName="Country1",opposition=c("all"),homeOrAway=c("all"),matchType="Test",plot=TRUE)

# Plot the performance of Country1 Test team  against specific teams at home/away venues
#teamWinLossStatusAtGrounds("country1Test.csv",teamName="Country1",opposition=c("Country2","Country3","Country4"),homeOrAway=c("home","away","neutral"),matchType="Test",plot=TRUE)

2c. Test – Plot time lines of wins and losses

#plotTimelineofWinsLosses("country1Test.csv",team="Country1",opposition=c("all"), #startDate="1970-01-01",endDate="2017-01-01")
#plotTimelineofWinsLosses("country1Test.csv",team="Country1",opposition=c("Country2","Count#ry3","Country4"), homeOrAway=c("home",away","neutral"), startDate=<start Date> #,endDate=<endDate>)

3a. ODI – Analyzing test performances against opposition

#df <- teamWinLossStatusVsOpposition("team1ODI.csv",teamName="Team1",opposition=c("all"),homeOrAway=c("all"),matchType="ODI",plot=FALSE)
#head(df)

# Plot the performance of team1  in ODIs against Sri Lanka, India at all venues
#teamWinLossStatusVsOpposition("team1ODI.csv",teamName="Team1",opposition=c("all"),homeOrAway=c(all"),matchType="ODI",plot=TRUE)

# Plot the performance of Team1 ODI team  against specific teams at home/away venues
#teamWinLossStatusVsOpposition("team1ODI.csv",teamName="Team1",opposition=c("Team2","Team3","Team4"),homeOrAway=c("home","away","neutral"),matchType="ODI",plot=TRUE)

3b. ODI – Analyzing test performances against opposition at different venues

#df <- teamWinLossStatusAtGrounds("team1ODI.csv",teamName="Team1",opposition=c("all"),homeOrAway=c("all"),matchType="ODI",plot=FALSE)
#head(df)

# Plot the performance of Team1s in ODIs specific ODI teams at all venues
#teamWinLossStatusAtGrounds("team1ODI.csv",teamName="Team1",opposition=c("all"),homeOrAway=c(all"),matchType="ODI",plot=TRUE)

# Plot the performance of Team1 against specific ODI teams at home/away venues
#teamWinLossStatusAtGrounds("team1ODI.csv",teamName="Team1",opposition=c("Team2","Team3","Team4"),homeOrAway=c("home","away","neutral"),matchType="ODI",plot=TRUE)

3c. ODI – Plot time lines of wins and losses

#Plot the time line of wins/losses of Bangladesh ODI team between 2 dates all venues
#plotTimelineofWinsLosses("team1ODI.csv",team="Team1",startDate=<start date> ,endDa#te=<end date>,matchType="ODI")

#Plot the time line of wins/losses against specific opposition between 2 dates
#plotTimelineofWinsLosses("team1ODI.csv",team="Team1",opposition=c("Team2","Team2"), homeOrAway=c("home",away","neutral"), startDate=<start date>,endDate=<end date> ,matchType="ODI")

4a. T20 – Analyzing test performances against opposition

#df <- teamWinLossStatusVsOpposition("teamT20.csv",teamName="Team1",opposition=c("all"),homeOrAway=c("all"),matchType="T20",plot=FALSE)
#head(df)

# Plot the performance of Team1 in T20s  against  all opposition at all venues
#teamWinLossStatusVsOpposition("teamT20.csv",teamName="Team1",opposition=c("all"),homeOrAway=c(all"),matchType="T20",plot=TRUE)

# Plot the performance of T20 Test team  against specific teams at home/away venues
#teamWinLossStatusVsOpposition("teamT20.csv",teamName="Team1",opposition=c("Team2","Team3","Team4"),homeOrAway=c("home","away","neutral"),matchType="T20",plot=TRUE)

4b. T20 – Analyzing test performances against opposition at different venues

#df <- teamWinLossStatusAtGrounds("teamT20.csv",teamName="Team1",opposition=c("all"),homeOrAway=c("all"),matchType="T20",plot=FALSE)
#head(df)

# Plot the performance of Team1s in ODIs specific ODI teams at all venues
#teamWinLossStatusAtGrounds("teamT20.csv",teamName="Team1",opposition=c("all"),homeOrAway=c(all"),matchType="T20",plot=TRUE)

# Plot the performance of Team1 against specific ODI teams at home/away venues
#teamWinLossStatusAtGrounds("teamT20.csv",teamName="Team1",opposition=c("Team2","Team3","Team4"),homeOrAway=c("home","away","neutral"),matchType="T20",plot=TRUE)

4c. T20 – Plot time lines of wins and losses

#Plot the time line of wins/losses of Bangladesh ODI team between 2 dates all venues
#plotTimelineofWinsLosses("teamT20.csv",team="Team1",startDate=<start date> ,endDa#te=<end date>,matchType="T20")

#Plot the time line of wins/losses against specific opposition between 2 dates
#plotTimelineofWinsLosses("teamT20.csv",team="Team1",opposition=c("Team2","Team2"), homeOrAway=c("home",away","neutral"), startDate=<start date>,endDate=<end date> ,matchType="T20")

Key Findings

Analysis of batsman

Analysis of bowlers

Analysis of teams

Conclusion

Using the above template, analysis can be done for both batsmen and bowlers in Test, ODI and T20. Also analysis of any any team in Test, ODI and T20 against other specific opposition, at home/away and neutral venues can be performed.

Have fun with cricketr!!

Also see
1. Practical Machine Learning with R and Python – Part 5
2. Using Linear Programming (LP) for optimizing bowling change or batting lineup in T20 cricket
3. yorkr crashes the IPL party ! – Part 1
4. Deep Learning from first principles in Python, R and Octave – Part 6
5. Cricpy takes a swing at the ODIs
6. Bull in a china shop – Behind the scenes in Android
7. Eliminating the Performance Drag
To see all posts click Index of posts

My book ‘Cricket analytics with cricketr and cricpy’ is now on Amazon

‘Cricket analytics with cricketr and cricpy – Analytics harmony with R and Python’ is now available on Amazon in both paperback ($21.99) and kindle ($9.99/Rs 449) versions. The book includes analysis of cricketers using both my R package ‘cricketr’ and my python package ‘cricpy’ for all formats of the game namely Test, ODI and T20. Both packages use data from ESPN Cricinfo Statsguru. The paperback is available on Amazon for $21.99 and the kindle version is available for $9.99/Rs 449

Pick up your copy today!

The book includes the following chapters

CONTENTS

Introduction 7
1. Cricket analytics with cricketr 9
1.1. Introducing cricketr! : An R package to analyze performances of cricketers 10
1.2. Taking cricketr for a spin – Part 1 48
1.2. cricketr digs the Ashes! 69
1.3. cricketr plays the ODIs! 97
1.4. cricketr adapts to the Twenty20 International! 139
1.5. Sixer – R package cricketr’s new Shiny avatar 168
1.6. Re-introducing cricketr! : An R package to analyze performances of cricketers 178
1.7. cricketr sizes up legendary All-rounders of yesteryear 233
1.8. cricketr flexes new muscles: The final analysis 277
1.9. The Clash of the Titans in Test and ODI cricket 300
1.10. Analyzing performances of cricketers using cricketr template 338
2. Cricket analytics with cricpy 352
2.1 Introducing cricpy:A python package to analyze performances of cricketers 353
2.2 Cricpy takes a swing at the ODIs 405
Analysis of Top 4 batsman 448
2.3 Cricpy takes guard for the Twenty20s 449
2.4 Analyzing batsmen and bowlers with cricpy template 490
9. Average runs against different opposing teams 493
3. Other cricket posts in R 500
3.1 Analyzing cricket’s batting legends – Through the mirage with R 500
3.2 Mirror, mirror … the best batsman of them all? 527
4. Appendix 541
Cricket analysis with Machine Learning using Octave 541
4.1 Informed choices through Machine Learning – Analyzing Kohli, Tendulkar and Dravid 542
4.2 Informed choices through Machine Learning-2 Pitting together Kumble, Kapil, Chandra 555
Further reading 569
Important Links 570

Also see
1. My book “Deep Learning from first principles” now on Amazon
2. Practical Machine Learning with R and Python – Part 1
3. Revisiting World Bank data analysis with WDI and gVisMotionChart
4. Natural language processing: What would Shakespeare say?
5. Optimal Cloud Computing
6. Pitching yorkpy … short of good length to IPL – Part 1
7. Computer Vision: Ramblings on derivatives, histograms and contours

To see all posts click Index of posts

Revisiting World Bank data analysis with WDI and gVisMotionChart

Note: I had written a post about 3 years back on World Bank Data Analysis using World Development Indicators (WDI) & gVisMotionCharts. But the motion charts stopped working  some time ago. I have always been wanting to fix this and I now got to actually doing it. The issue was 2 of the WDI indicators had changed. After I fixed this I was able to host the generated motion chart using github.io pages. Please make sure that you enable flash player if you open the motion charts with Google Chrome. You may also have to enable flash if using Firefox, IE etc

Please check out the 2 motions charts with World Bank data

1. World Bank Chart 1
2. World Bank Chart 2

If you are using Chrome please enable (Allow)  ‘flash player’ by clicking on the lock sign in the URL as shown

 

 

 

 

 

 

Introduction

Recently I was surfing the web, when I came across a real cool post New R package to access World Bank data, by Markus Gesmann on using googleVis and motion charts with World Bank Data. The post also introduced me to Hans Rosling, Professor of Sweden’s Karolinska Institute. Hans Rosling, the creator of the famous Gapminder chart, the “Heath and Wealth of Nations” displays global trends through animated charts (A must see!!!). As they say, in Hans Rosling’s hands, data dances and sings. Take a look at  his Ted talks for e.g. Hans Rosling:New insights on poverty. Prof Rosling developed the breakthrough software behind the visualizations, in the Gapminder. The free software, which can be loaded with any data – was purchased by Google in March 2007.

In this post, I recreate some of the Gapminder charts with the help of R packages WDI and googleVis. The WDI  package of  Vincent Arel-Bundock, provides a set of really useful functions to get to data based on the World Bank Data indicators.  googleVis provides motion charts with which you can animate the data.

You can clone/download the code from Github at worldBankAnalysis which is in the form of an Rmd file.

library(WDI)
library(ggplot2)
library(googleVis)
library(plyr)

1.Get the data from 1960 to 2019 for the following

  1. Population – SP.POP.TOTL
  2. GDP in US $ – NY.GDP.MKTP.CD
  3. Life Expectancy at birth (Years) – SP.DYN.LE00.IN
  4. GDP Per capita income – NY.GDP.PCAP.PP.CD
  5. Fertility rate (Births per woman) – SP.DYN.TFRT.IN
  6. Poverty headcount ratio – SI.POV.NAHC
# World population total
population = WDI(indicator='SP.POP.TOTL', country="all",start=1960, end=2019)
# GDP in US $
gdp= WDI(indicator='NY.GDP.MKTP.CD', country="all",start=1960, end=2019)
# Life expectancy at birth (Years)
lifeExpectancy= WDI(indicator='SP.DYN.LE00.IN', country="all",start=1960, end=2019)
# GDP Per capita
income = WDI(indicator='NY.GDP.PCAP.PP.CD', country="all",start=1960, end=2019)
# Fertility rate (births per woman)
fertility = WDI(indicator='SP.DYN.TFRT.IN', country="all",start=1960, end=2019)
# Poverty head count
poverty= WDI(indicator='SI.POV.NAHC', country="all",start=1960, end=2019)

2.Rename the columns

names(population)[3]="Total population"
names(lifeExpectancy)[3]="Life Expectancy (Years)"
names(gdp)[3]="GDP (US$)"
names(income)[3]="GDP per capita income"
names(fertility)[3]="Fertility (Births per woman)"
names(poverty)[3]="Poverty headcount ratio"

3.Join the data frames

Join the individual data frames to one large wide data frame with all the indicators for the countries
j1 <- join(population, gdp)

j2 <- join(j1,lifeExpectancy)

j3 <- join(j2,income)

j4 <- join(j3,poverty)

wbData <- join(j4,fertility)

4.Use WDI_data

Use WDI_data to get the list of indicators and the countries. Join the countries and region

#This returns  list of 2 matrixes
wdi_data =WDI_data
# The 1st matrix is the list is the set of all World Bank Indicators
indicators=wdi_data[[1]]
# The 2nd  matrix gives the set of countries and regions
countries=wdi_data[[2]]
df = as.data.frame(countries)
aa <- df$region != "Aggregates"
# Remove the aggregates
countries_df <- df[aa,]
# Subset from the development data only those corresponding to the countries
bb = subset(wbData, country %in% countries_df$country)
cc = join(bb,countries_df)
dd = complete.cases(cc)
developmentDF = cc[dd,]

5.Create and display the motion chart

gg<- gvisMotionChart(cc,
                                idvar = "country",
                                timevar = "year",
                                xvar = "GDP",
                                yvar = "Life Expectancy",
                                sizevar ="Population",
                                colorvar = "region")
plot(gg)
cat(gg$html$chart, file="chart1.html")

Note: Unfortunately it is not possible to embed the motion chart in WordPress. It is has to hosted on a server as a Webpage. After exploring several possibilities I came up with the following process to display the animation graph. The plot is saved as a html file using ‘cat’ as shown above. The WorldBank_chart1.html page is then hosted as a Github page (gh-page) on Github.

Here is the ggvisMotionChart

Do give  World Bank Motion Chart1  a spin.  Here is how the Motion Chart has to be used

untitled

You can select Life Expectancy, Population, Fertility etc by clicking the black arrows. The blue arrow shows the ‘play’ button to set animate the motion chart. You can also select the countries and change the size of the circles. Do give it a try. Here are some quick analysis by playing around with the motion charts with different parameters chosen

The set of charts below are screenshots captured by running the motion chart World Bank Motion Chart1

a. Life Expectancy vs Fertility chart

This chart is used by Hans Rosling in his Ted talk. The left chart shows low life expectancy and high fertility rate for several sub Saharan and East Asia Pacific countries in the early 1960’s. Today the fertility has dropped and the life expectancy has increased overall. However the sub Saharan countries still have a high fertility rate

pic1

b. Population vs GDP

The chart below shows that GDP of India and China have the same GDP from 1973-1994 with US and Japan well ahead.

pic2

From 1998- 2014 China really pulls away from India and Japan as seen below

pic3

c. Per capita income vs Life Expectancy

In the 1990’s the per capita income and life expectancy of the sub -saharan countries are low (42-50). Japan and US have a good life expectancy in 1990’s. In 2014 the per capita income of the sub-saharan countries are still low though the life expectancy has marginally improved.

pic4

d. Population vs Poverty headcount

pic5

In the early 1990’s China had a higher poverty head count ratio than India. By 2004 China had this all figured out and the poverty head count ratio drops significantly. This can also be seen in the chart below.

pop_pov3

In the chart above China shows a drastic reduction in poverty headcount ratio vs India. Strangely Zambia shows an increase in the poverty head count ratio.

6.Get the data for the 2nd set of indicators

  1. Total population  – SP.POP.TOTL
  2. GDP in US$ – NY.GDP.MKTP.CD
  3. Access to electricity (% population) – EG.ELC.ACCS.ZS
  4. Electricity consumption KWh per capita -EG.USE.ELEC.KH.PC
  5. CO2 emissions -EN.ATM.CO2E.KT
  6. Basic Sanitation Access – SH.STA.BASS.ZS
# World population
population = WDI(indicator='SP.POP.TOTL', country="all",start=1960, end=2016)
# GDP in US $
gdp= WDI(indicator='NY.GDP.MKTP.CD', country="all",start=1960, end=2016)
# Access to electricity (% population)
elecAccess= WDI(indicator='EG.ELC.ACCS.ZS', country="all",start=1960, end=2016)
# Electric power consumption Kwh per capita
elecConsumption= WDI(indicator='EG.USE.ELEC.KH.PC', country="all",start=1960, end=2016)
#CO2 emissions
co2Emissions= WDI(indicator='EN.ATM.CO2E.KT', country="all",start=1960, end=2016)
# Access to sanitation (% population)
sanitationAccess= WDI(indicator='SH.STA.ACSN', country="all",start=1960, end=2016)

7.Rename the columns

names(population)[3]="Total population"
names(gdp)[3]="GDP US($)"
names(elecAccess)[3]="Access to Electricity (% popn)"
names(elecConsumption)[3]="Electric power consumption (KWH per capita)"
names(co2Emissions)[3]="CO2 emisions"
names(sanitationAccess)[3]="Access to sanitation(% popn)"

8.Join the individual data frames

Join the individual data frames to one large wide data frame with all the indicators for the countries


j1 <- join(population, gdp)
j2 <- join(j1,elecAccess)
j3 <- join(j2,elecConsumption)
j4 <- join(j3,co2Emissions)
wbData1 <- join(j3,sanitationAccess)

 

9.Use WDI_data

Use WDI_data to get the list of indicators and the countries. Join the countries and region

#This returns  list of 2 matrixes
wdi_data =WDI_data
# The 1st matrix is the list is the set of all World Bank Indicators
indicators=wdi_data[[1]]
# The 2nd  matrix gives the set of countries and regions
countries=wdi_data[[2]]
df = as.data.frame(countries)
aa <- df$region != "Aggregates"
# Remove the aggregates
countries_df <- df[aa,]
# Subset from the development data only those corresponding to the countries
ee = subset(wbData1, country %in% countries_df$country)
ff = join(ee,countries_df)
## Joining by: iso2c, country

10.Create and display the motion chart

gg1<- gvisMotionChart(ff,
                                idvar = "country",
                                timevar = "year",
                                xvar = "GDP",
                                yvar = "Access to Electricity",
                                sizevar ="Population",
                                colorvar = "region")
plot(gg1)
cat(gg1$html$chart, file="chart2.html")

This is World Bank Motion Chart2  which has a different set of parameters like Access to Energy, CO2 emissions etc

The set of charts below are screenshots of the motion chart World Bank Motion Chart 2

a. Access to Electricity vs Population
pic6The above chart shows that in China 100% population have access to electricity. India has made decent progress from 50% in 1990 to 79% in 2012. However Pakistan seems to have been much better in providing access to electricity. Pakistan moved from 59% to close 98% access to electricity

b. Power consumption vs population

powercon

The above chart shows the Power consumption vs Population. China and India have proportionally much lower consumption that Norway, US, Canada

c. CO2 emissions vs Population

pic7

In 1963 the CO2 emissions were fairly low and about comparable for all countries. US, India have shown a steady increase while China shows a steep increase. Interestingly UK shows a drop in CO2 emissions

d.  Access to sanitation
san

India shows an improvement but it has a long way to go with only 40% of population with access to sanitation. China has made much better strides with 80% having access to sanitation in 2015. Strangely Nigeria shows a drop in sanitation by almost about 20% of population.

The code is available at Github at worldBankAnalysis

Conclusion: So there you have it. I have shown some screenshots of some sample parameters of the World indicators. Please try to play around with World Bank Motion Chart1 & World Bank Motion Chart 2  with your own set of parameters and countries.  You can also create your own motion chart from the 100s of WDI indicators avaialable at  World Bank Data indicator.

Also see
1. My book ‘Deep Learning from first principles:Second Edition’ now on Amazon
2.  Dabbling with Wiener filter using OpenCV
3. My book ‘Practical Machine Learning in R and Python: Third edition’ on Amazon
4. Design Principles of Scalable, Distributed Systems
5. Re-introducing cricketr! : An R package to analyze performances of cricketers
6. Natural language processing: What would Shakespeare say?
7. Brewing a potion with Bluemix, PostgreSQL, Node.js in the cloud
8. Simulating an Edge Shape in Android

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